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" For, to say nothing of half the birds, and some quadrupeds which are almost entirely supported by them, worms seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and... "
Rural Sports - Page 283
by William Barker Daniel - 1812
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The Natural History of Selborne: With A Naturalist's Calendar & Additional ...

Gilbert White - 1887 - 392 pages
...seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called wormcasts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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Chambers's Encyclopaedia: A Dictionary of Universal Knowledge, Volume 4

1890 - 872 pages
...seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by lioring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of all kinds into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth. . . ....
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The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne: In the County of Southampton

Gilbert White - 1891 - 568 pages
...worms seem to be great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm casts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne

Gilbert White - 1891 - 534 pages
...seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called wormcasts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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The Study of Animal Life

John Arthur Thomson - 1892 - 398 pages
...seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called wormcasts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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CHAMBERS'S ENCYCLOPAEDIA: A DICTIONARY OF UNIVERSAL KNOWLEDGE NEW EDITION ...

ROBERT CHAMBERS - 1892
...to l╗e the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by lioring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of all kinds into it; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth. . . ....
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The Natural History of Selborne

Gilbert White - 1893 - 368 pages
...shows her affection f >r these foundlings, and that she supposed the squirrels to be her own young." M and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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Natural History of Selborne & Observations on Nature, Volume 2

Gilbert White - 1895 - 268 pages
...seem to be great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them ; by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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Chambers's Encyclopaedia: A Dictionary of Universal Knowledge, Volume 4

1896 - 846 pages
...renderinš it pervious to rains and the hbres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of all kinds into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth. . . . Worms probably provide new soils for hills and slopes where the rain washes the...
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The Great World's Farm: Some Account of Nature's Crops and how They are Grown

Selina Gaye - 1900 - 412 pages
...natural history.' ' Vegetation would proceed but lamely without it, so great are its services in boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth, which is a fine manure for grain and grass.' Gardeners and farmers hated the worm in...
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