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" For, to say nothing of half the birds, and some quadrupeds which are almost entirely supported by them, worms seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and... "
Rural Sports - Page 283
by William Barker Daniel - 1812
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Journal of the Statistical Society of London, Volume 41

1878 - 740 pages
...seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but tamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the tibres of plants ; by drawing straws and twigs into it ; and most of all by throwing up such infinite...
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The natural history of Selborne, and The naturalist's calendar

Gilbert White - 1879
...seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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The famines of the world: past and present. 2 papers read before the ...

Cornelius Walford - 1879
...seem to he the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed hut tamely without them, hy horing, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fihres of plants ; hy drawing straws and twigs into it and most of all hy throwing up such infinite...
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Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 65

Henry Mills Alden, Frederick Lewis Allen, Lee Foster Hartman, Thomas Bucklin Wells - 1882 - 988 pages
...vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring and perforating and loosening tho soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres...of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves into it, and most of all by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth, called worm - casts,...
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Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 65

Henry Mills Alden, Frederick Lewis Allen, Lee Foster Hartman, Thomas Bucklin Wells - 1882 - 994 pages
...and rendering it pervious to rains aud the fibres of plants, by drawing straws aud stalks of leaves into it, and most of all by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth, called worm - casts, which being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain aud grass....
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Charles Darwin

Grant Allen - 1885 - 206 pages
...seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth, called worm-casts,...
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Charles Darwin

Grant Allen - 1885 - 238 pages
...and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth, called worm-casts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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The Natural History of Selborne: With A Naturalist's Calendar & Additional ...

Gilbert White - 1887 - 396 pages
...seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called wormcasts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne, in the County of Southampton

Gilbert White - 1888 - 602 pages
...worms seem to be great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm casts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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Natural History and Antiquities of Selbourne

Gilbert White - 1887 - 554 pages
...seem to be great promoters of vegetation., which would proceed but lamely without them ; by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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