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" For, to say nothing of half the birds, and some quadrupeds which are almost entirely supported by them, worms seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and... "
Rural Sports - Page 283
by William Barker Daniel - 1812
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The Natural History of Selborne: With Observations on Various Parts of ...

Gilbert White - 1854 - 532 pages
...promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and looacuing the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the...of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth, called worm-casts,...
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The Lithology of Edinburgh

John Fleming - 1859 - 102 pages
...seem to be the great promoters of vegetation (which would proceed but ill without them) by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps called worm-casts, which form a fine manure for grain and grass. Worms probably provide new soil...
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Earth, Sea and Sky, Or, the Hand of God in the Works of Nature, Volume 1

John Marius Wilson - 1859 - 416 pages
...worms seem to be great promoters of vegetation. which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it_ and, most of all, by throwing up such infmite numbers of lumps of earth, called worm-casts, which,...
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The natural history of Selborne, arranged for young persons [by G. Ellis].

Gilbert White - 1860
...shows her affection for these foundlings, and that she supposed the squirrels to be her own young." and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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The Natural History of Selborne: With Miscellaneous Observations and ...

Gilbert White - 1862 - 456 pages
...seem to be great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but, lamely without them ; by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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The home tutor, a treasury of self-culture

Home tutor - 1862
...seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it : and most of all by throwing...
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A Catalogue of the British Non-parasitical Worms in the Collection of the ...

British Museum (Natural History). Department of Zoology, George Johnston - 1865 - 444 pages
...worms seem to be great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating and loosening the soil, and rendering...drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into itt; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which...
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Practical and Scientific Fruit Culture

Charles R. Baker - 1866 - 532 pages
...vegetation, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to the rain and fibers of plants, by drawing straws, and stalks of leaves and twigs into it; they also throw up an infinite number of lumps of earth, called worm-casts, which, being their excrement,...
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Monthly Journal of Science, and Annals of Biology, Astronomy ..., Volume 4

James Samuelson, William Crookes - 1867 - 672 pages
...seem to be the great promoters of vegetation (which would proceed but ill without them) by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks and leaves and twigs into it, and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps, called...
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The Quarterly Journal of Science, Volume 4

1867 - 652 pages
...seem to be the great promoters of vegetation (which would proceed but ill without them) by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering...the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks and leaves and twigs into it, and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps, called...
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