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THE ANNALS OF ENGLAND.

I HAVE read the "Annals of England" as it passed through the Press for this Edition, and am able to testify to its general accuracy and great usefulness. Without pledging myself to every date or every view that is found in it, I still believe it to be the most valuable compendium of our history that we possess, and I know that its use as a handbook in lecture has been well proved, both by my predecessor Mr. Goldwin Smith and myself.

W. STUBBS, M.A.

KETTEL HALL, Oxford.
October, 1875.

THE

ANNALS OF ENGLAND:

AN

EPITOME OF ENGLISH HISTORY,

FROM CONTEMPORARY WRITERS, THE ROLLS

OF PARLIAMENT, AND OTHER

PUBLIC RECORDS.

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ADVERTISEMENT.

VAST additions have been made to our knowledge of the true sources

of English history since these "Annals" were compiled, and in preparing a new edition, this fact has been steadily kept in view; hence the book is an attempt to represent men and events as seen in the light of the latest discoveries among the Public Records, and in Chronicles and Histories now for the first time printed by the Government or by Literary Societies.

It may be safely asserted that the compilation of a complete and trustworthy History of our country is a work yet to be accomplished, but the throwing open of the treasures of the Public Record Office to all who are, or choose to make themselves able to use them, must sooner or later relieve English literature from this reproach. The Compiler has endeavoured to profit by the facilities now afforded to literary men, but merely as a beginner in the good work. The excellent Calendars drawn up by some of the Officers of the Record Establishment, and the annual Reports of the Deputy Keeper, are eminently suggestive of the new light that might be thrown on numberless doubtful passages of our history, if the clues thus furnished were properly followed up by writers not afraid of labour, and seeking only to discover facts.

It has been the desire of the Compiler to conduct his researches in this spirit; with what success his readers must determine. If what he has attempted should induce others to give increased attention to the study of our National Records his end will be answered.

W. E. F.

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