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THE

AMERICAN

CATHOLIC QUARTERLY

REVIEW.

Bonum est homini ut eum veritas vincat volentem, quia malum est homini ut eum veritas

vincat invitum. Nam ipsa vincat necesse est, sive negantem sive confitentem.

S. AUG. EPIST. ccxxxviii. AD PASCENT.

VOLUME XVII.

FROM JANUARY TO OCTOBER, 1892.

PHILADELPHIA:
HARDY & MAHONY,

PUBLISHERS AND PROPrietors,

505 CHESTNUT STREET.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS.

NATIONALISM. THE CONCLAVE and the NeXT POPE. By Rt. Rev. Mgr.

Bernard O'Reilly, D.D.,

Untimely curiosity regarding the immediate successor of Leo XIII.. and the place
where the next conclave will be held, 1; People should not be misled by the ac-
tion of the Italian Government, 2; Why Italy will protect the meeting of the next
conclave in Rome, 3; Whether the Holy Father seriously contemplates the neces-
sity of leaving Rome, 4; What may necessitate this, 5: Reasons why the next
conclave will be in Rome and the next Pope an Italian, 6; Action of the Spanish
Court, 7; Action of the French, German and Russian Governments, 8, 9; Will the
next Pope reside in Rome, 10; The Vicar of Christ the Bishop of Rome as well as
the Bishop of Bishops, 10-12; Description of the various departments of ecclesias-
tical administration, 13-16; How the ecclesiastical records have always been pil-
laged whenever the Pope was driven from Rome, 17; The position of Leo XIII.,
18, 19.

CONSCIOUS ACTS. By Rev. Walter H. Hill, S.J.,

What consciousness is; the intellect as directly conscious, and as reflexly con-

scious, 20; The first object actually known by the intellect, 21, 22; When the ac-

tion of the intellect is reflex or introspective, 23; Direct consciousness of self the

nearest approach of the human intellect, in our present state of existence, to-

wards apprehending the concrete singular, 24; An organic faculty is incapable of

either direct or reflexive consciousness, 25; Whether the intellect in its conscious-

ness apprehends only its own acts, 26; The soul considered as knowing itself

under two respects, 27; Dr. Reid's inaccuracies and errors, 28, 29; Errors of Mill,

Sir William Hamilton agreeing with Luther, 30; St. Thomas, 31.

"IN NECESSARIIS UNITAS, IN DUBIIS LIBERTAS, IN OMNIBUS CARITAS." By

B. B, ...

What we are to understand by "necessary" things, 32: How far are non-Catholics

culpable in refusing to believe in the divine mission of the Catholic Church and

in what she proposes for our belief? 33-35; "In Dubiis Libertas," what this means,

36: The claims of reason upon us; what we are free to hold as true and what not, 37,

38: The Council of Trent and the Council of the Vatican, 39, 40; The Syllabus. 41;

Inspiration of the Sacred Scriptures, views of Cardinal Newman and Canon Bar-

tolo, 41, 42; Refutation of Canon Bartolo's ideas, 43, 45.

CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS. No. 1. DESTINY-PREPARATION. By Richard
H. Clarke, LL.D.,

Christopher Columbus a man of destiny, 47; What Columbus himself said on this

subject, 48: What others thought and said, 49, 50; Significance of the names Co-

lunibus received, 51: Tendency of modern writers to ignore every Providential

circumstance in Columbus's life, 52; Columbus's own convictions, 53; Contention

about the birthplace of Columbus, 54: Columbus training for his subsequent ca-

reer, 55, 56; His youthful occupations and pursuits, 57, 58; His residence in Por-

tugal. 59, 60: His favorite studies, 61: His noble physique, 62; His marriage and

occupations in Portugal, 63; Portuguese discoveries in Africa and Asia, 64, 65;

Columbus's wife's father, 66; A malignant calumny, 67; The results of Columbus's

seven years' residence in Lisbon, 68; Testimonies of historians to his exalted char-

acter and genius, 69–71.

AMERICAN CATHOLICS AND THE TEMPORAL POWER OF THE POPE. By Very

Rev. Mgr. Joseph Schroeder, D.D.

An objection stated, 72; Certain undeniable facts, 73; The true question, 74; What

the writer excludes from his discussion and what he proposes to prove, 75, 76; An

indirect answer and a direct answer, 77, 78; Popular sovereignty as a political

principle, 79-81; A two-fold conclusion, 82; Catholic citizens can acknowledge

the right of self-government without detriment to their religious principles, 83;

The spoliation of the Papal States considered as a mere political event, 84: The

Bishop of Rome by divine right must rule the Church, freely and independently,

85; To this end the Temporal Power is necessary, at present, 86: The occupation

of Rome will ever be a sacrilege, 87; Duty of Catholics to speak out, plainly and

boldly, 88; Salus Publita Şuprema Lex, 89; The respective objects of the Church and

of the State, 90; The welfare of the whole Church demands the re-establishment

of the Temporal Power, 91, 92: The re-establishment of the Temporal Power a

benefit to Italy itself, 93, 94: Washington, D. C., and Rome, 95; Conclusion, 96, 97.

OUR YOUNG MEN-WHAT SHALL WE DO WITH THEM? By Rev. Michael

J. Lavelle,

The honored approval of this movement not only by eminent prelates but by the

Sovereign Pontiff of the Church, 98; The need of this movement, 99-101; Its ear-

liest projectors, 102; Mistakes rather than faults, 103; Accomplished results of the

movement, 104; The National Uniòn, 105; Diocesan Unions, 106-108.

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