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damaged and patched. arbara Schelin sin... Our Lady of Sorrow. Paul. No inscription. Angel weighing souls. Samuel Gla... har ändrich under Hauptma Semidt Kumpeny und Anna Klapmany sin Ehegemachel, 1630 Jar.

Monk and hermit praying. SS. Peter and

At the top of the picture a weaver at work. Angel weighing souls, a man standing by. S. Cecilia playing the organ. A priest in surplice and cassock playing the horn, choristers singing. Above, LAUDATE DOMINUM IN TYMPANO ET CHORO. LAUDATE EUM IN CHORDIS ET ORGANO. Below, D. CASPAR HOCKS PRÆBENDARIUS DNI T(H)OME APLI ET CONCENTOR COLLEGIATE... LESIE BERONENSIS. ANNO DOMINI 1615.

A priest in cassock and surplice kneeling with beads in his hand. To the left Virgin and Child, to the right an angel with his hand resting on the priest's shoulder. No inscription.

Men working at house building. Coat of arms. D. Chaspar Wollft und Anna Koüstin sin Eelicher Gemahell.

Several men apparently engaged in smelting iron. A coat of arms with a figure on either side. anns Hu(tter). . . vogt zu Osterwangen.

The following extract from a letter, received by me since the above was in type, from Herr Augst, of Zurich, explains how this glass came on the market. You are quite right in supposing that most of the glass is of profane origin. The panels are gifts by private persons to each other, by one town to another, &c. There must have been an enormous quantity of such glass in private and public buildings in Switzerland during the 15th-17th centuries. After the invasion of Switzerland by the French in 1798-9, and the general impoverishment of the continent after the Napoleonic war, many owners of antiquities were glad to sell them to anybody willing to buy them, and most of the Swiss glass in England was acquired at that time, viz. in the early part of this century. As regards heraldry, a knowledge of English heraldry would not be of much use in explaining the Swiss coats of arms, many of which belong to peasant families.

E. H. S.

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ELIZABETH, b. 1646, d. 1687.

TRYPHÆNA LEIGH.

WILLIAM, 2nd Baron Craven, of the creation of 1666, b. 1668.

Eight sons.

Eight daughters.

WILLIAM,
b. 1571.

MARGARET,
b. 1603.

ROBERT,

b. 1574, d. 1601.

MARY SHEAR THOMAS, b.
WOOD, 1602,

WILLIAM.

ELLEN.

1578.

3 daughters.

d. 1670.

ELIZABETH, Lady Powis, b. 1600.

MARY, Lady
Coventry,
b. 1602.

WILLIAM,
Earl of
Craven, b.
1608, d. 1697.

JOHN, Baron = ELIZABETH, d. of THOMAS, b.

Craven of Ry

ton, b. 1610, d.

Will. 2nd Baron
Spencer.

1617, d. 1637,

unm.

8.p. 1648, title
extinct.

= THOMAS
CRAVEN,
v. inf.

ANNE,
b. 1606,

d. 1623.

HENRY,
b. 1608,
d. 1634,

Sir WILLIAM, of
Lenchwick
b. 1610, d.
1655.

ELIZABETH, d.
of Ferdinand,
Vinct. Fair-
fax.

THOMAS, b.
1612, d. 1682.

ANN PROC-
TER, d. 1681.

Sir ANTHONY,
d. 1670, s.p.

ELIZABETH, d.
of Baron Pel-
nets of Mark,
Germany.

JOHN,
b. & d.
1618.

ROBERT,
b. 1618.

* Earldom and Barony of 1626-7 became extinct.

SECOND FAMILY.

ANTHONY CRAVEN, the alderman's "cousin," d. 1617 ANN CROFTE, 1576, d. 1614.

JANE, b. 1577.

MARY, b. 1578.

ISABEL, b. 1581.

JOHN, b. & d. 1584. THOMAS, b. 1585, d. 1636. MARGARET CRAVEN.

Daughter, b. 1592.

WILLIAM, b. 1596.

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Creations:-(1) Barony of Hampsted Marshall, 1626-7, extinct in 1697; (2) Barony of Ryton, 1642-3, extinct in 1648; (3) Earldom and Viscounty, 1664-5, extinct in 1697; (4) second Barony of Hamsted Marshall (with special remainder), 1666.

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