A Popular and Descriptive Account of the Steam Engine: Comprising a General View of the Various Modes of Employing Elastic Vapour as a Prime Mover in Mechanics; and on Steam Navigation; with an Appendix of Patents and Parliamentary Papers Connected with that Subject

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J. Weale, 1836 - 330 pages

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Page 267 - Orders of The House, examined the matters to them referred; and have agreed to the following REPORT...
Page i - Soon shall thy arm, unconquer'd Steam, afar Drag the slow barge, or drive the rapid car ; Or, on wide-waving wings expanded bear The flying chariot through the fields of air...
Page 298 - A Description and Draught of a new-invented Machine, for carrying Vessels or Ships out of, or into, any Harbour, Port, or River, against Wind and Tide, or in a calm.
Page 182 - ... vessel moves round, it is supplied with steam from the boiler, and that which has performed its office may either be discharged by means of condensers, or into the open air.
Page 94 - Resolved, That the Chairman be directed to move the House, that leave be given to bring in a Bill for enforcing such regulations as may be...
Page 29 - Fourthly, I intend, in many cases, to employ the expansive force of steam to press on the pistons, or whatever may be used instead of them, in the, same manner as the pressure of the atmosphere is now employed in common fire-engines.
Page 8 - An admirable and most forcible way to drive up water by fire, not by drawing or sucking it upwards, for that must be as the philosopher calleth it, infra spheeram activitatis, which is but at such a distance. But this way hath no bounder, if the vessels be strong enough ; for I have taken a piece of a whole cannon, whereof the end was burst, and filled it...
Page 297 - ... the breadth, the remainder shall be esteemed the just length of the keel to find the tonnage ; and the breadth shall be taken from the outside of the outside plank in the broadest place in the ship, be it either above or below the main wales...
Page 182 - I intend, in many cases, to employ the expansive force of steam to press on the pistons, or whatever may be used instead of them, in the same manner in which the pressure of the atmosphere is now employed in common fire engines.
Page 291 - Sufficient evidence has been adduced to convince your committee — 1. That carriages can be propelled by steam on common roads at an average rate of ten miles per hour. 2. That at this rate they have conveyed upwards of fourteen passengers.

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