Salmonia; Or: Days of Fly Fishing. With Some Accounts of the Habits of Fishes Belonging to the Genus Salmo

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Roberts Bros., 1870 - 305 pages

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Page 168 - ... he is usually the last person to decide upon the impossibility of any two series of events being independent of each other; and in science, so many natural miracles, as it were, have been brought to light — such as the fall of stones from meteors in the atmosphere, the disarming...
Page 103 - ... is mixed with much albumen and gelatine, and is extremely liable to decompose, and by keeping it cool the decomposition is retarded, and by the boiling salt and water, which is of a higher temperature than that of common boiling water, the albumen is coagulated, and the curdiness preserved. The crimping, by preventing the irritability of the fibre from being gradually exhausted, seems to preserve it so hard and crisp, that it breaks under the teeth ; and a fresh fish not crimped is generally...
Page 196 - Such is the energy of these little animals, that they continue to find their way, in immense numbers, to Loch Erne. The same thing happens at the...
Page 86 - Look at the bird ! She dashes into the water falling like a rock, and raising a column of spray; she has fallen from a great height. And now she rises again into the air; what an extraordinary sight!
Page 165 - ... driven out of the ground by severe floods ; and the fish, on which they prey in fine weather in the sea, leave the surface and go deeper in storms. The search after food, as we agreed on a former occasion, is the principal cause why animals change their places.
Page 163 - I have generally observed a coppery or yellow sunset to foretel rain; but, as an indication of wet weather approaching, nothing is more certain than a halo round the moon, which is produced by the precipitated water ; and the larger the circle, the nearer the clouds, and consequently the more ready to fall. HAL. — I have often observed that the old proverb is correct — A rainbow in the morning is the shepherd's warning: A rainbow at night is the shepherd's delight.
Page 87 - They began by rising from the top of a mountain in the eye of the sun, (it was about mid-day, and bright for this climate.) They at first made small circles, and the young birds imitated them ; they paused on their wings, waiting till they had made their first flight, and then took a second and larger gyration, — always rising towards the sun, and enlarging their circle of flight so as to make a gradually extending spiral. The young ones still slowly followed, apparently flying better as they mounted...
Page 167 - The singular connections of causes and effects, to which you have just referred, make superstition less to be wondered at, particularly amongst the vulgar ; and when two facts, naturally unconnected, have been accidentally coincident, it is not singular that this coincidence should have been observed and registered, and that omens of the most absurd kind should be trusted in. In the west of England, half a century ago, a particular hollow noise on the sea coast was referred to a spirit or goblin,...
Page 95 - I dare say has the mean temperature of the atmosphere in this climate, and is much under 50░ — place him there, and let him remain for ten minutes, and then carry him to the pot, and let the water and salt boil furiously before you put in a slice, and give time to the water to recover its heat before you throw in another, and so with the whole fish, and leave the head out and throw in the thickest pieces first.
Page 164 - Can you explain this omen? Phys. A rainbow can only occur when the clouds containing or depositing the rain are opposite to the sun,—and in the evening the rainbow is in the east, and in the morning in the west; and as our heavy rains in this climate are usually brought by the westerly wind, a rainbow in the west indicates that the...

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