Descriptive Catalogue of a Collection of the Economic Minerals of Canada, and of Its Crystalline Rocks. Sent to the London International Exhibition for 1862

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Lovell, 1862 - 83 pages
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Page 80 - Pseudomorphism, which is the change of one mineral species into another, by the introduction or the elimination of some element or elements, presupposes metamorphism ; since only definite mineral species can be the subjects of this process.
Page 28 - Ocean, the first thing which strikes us is, that, the north-east and south-east monsoons, which are found the one on the north and the other on...
Page 85 - It resembles the latter closely in appearance, being very black, brittle and lustrous, with a broad conchoidal fracture, and, like asphaltum, is destitute of structure, but differs in fusibility and in its relation to various solvents. It differs from true coal in being of one quality throughout, in containing no traces of vegetable tissues, and in its mode of occurrence, as a vein, and not as a bed. The vein occupies an irregular and nearly vertical fissure, and varies from one inch to seventeen...
Page 12 - The working of the mine however tip to the present time, has been confined to the extraction of the rich ore which was in sight. Little or nothing has been done for discovery, and it cannot be said how near to the present floor of the mine, may be found other masses, similar to those that have been excavated. Beyond these masses in opposite directions on the surface, the ore becomes more scattered in the strata ; but there is evidence of its continuance for several hundred feet, in spots and patches...
Page 32 - The latter is on the line of a dislocation which increases in going west and appears to die out to the eastward. The downthrow is on the north side, and brings the indurated calcareous marls of the Nipigon series on that side down to the level of the ironore beds (at the base of the series) on the south side, amounting to 400 feet. or upwards, on this location. The specimens are taken from a shaft sunk on a vein on the line of the eastward continuation of the dislocation, at a point from one to two...
Page 30 - ... interstratified with black bituminous shale in irregular layers of from one to three inches 10 Gray granular bituminous limestone of the same character as before in massive beds of from ten inches to two feet thick 10 Black and dark gray bituminous nodular limestone in beds varying from two to eight Inches in thickness 150...
Page 101 - plaster " deposits of Ontario belong to the Onondaga formation, which is extensively developed in Northern New York, crosses the Niagara River into Canada, and extends north-westward to Lake Huron, a distance of 150 miles, again appearing at the Straits of Mackinac between Lake Huron and Lake Michigan. It not only affords gypsum, but is also the source of valuable brine springs, and includes magnesian limestones, which are often suitable for the manufacture of hydraulic cement. The principal gypsum...
Page 48 - ... yellowish-brown or flesh-red cellular chert, the colors in some cases running in bands parallel to one another, and sometimes being rather confusedly mingled, giving the aspect of a breccia. The cells are unequally distributed, some parts...
Page 33 - W., cuts indurated red marl forty feet thick, underlain by grey quartzose sandstone, flanked by red granite at about 300 yards to the northward. At the surface there was a thickness of four feet of solid ore. . . . According to Professor Chapman of Toronto, this ore contains 47 % per cent. of lead and 10 per cent, of copper, together with an average of 17 dwt.
Page 101 - Cape Breton. At Wentworth there are stated to be "cliffs of solid snowy gypsum from 100 to 200 feet in height." Gypsum deposits occur in the Onondaga formations of Ontario, Canada, and are exploited along the Grand River between Cayuga and Paris. The mineral here occurs in lenticular masses varying from a few yards to a quarter of a mile in horizontal diameter and from 3 to 7 feet in thickness. The foreign sources of gypsum are almost too numerous to mention. Important beds occur in Lincolnshire...

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