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Chester Bridge & St. John's Church, Chethire.

Published for the Proprietors, by W. Clarke, New Bond Street, and J. Carpenter, Old Bond S7 Dece

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to sir Howel v-Favall, in rev ard very at-he bale of Poitiers, where he tanks, eh keg gisner, The revene of the mille

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one man,

CHESTER BRIDGE,

CHESHIRE.

THIS Bridge is an ancient structure, having seven arches of dissimilar workmanship: it is conjectured that no part of it is older than the conquest, as it appears from Doomsday Book that the provost had orders to summon from each hide of land in the county, for the purpose of rebuilding it; and in case of the non-appearance of the person summoned, his lord was to forfeit forty shillings to the king and earl. The city mills stand at the north end of the Bridge, and are supplied with water by a current formed by a large dam or causeway, raised obliquely across the river Dee: this causes a fall of nearly thirteen feet, and produces an interesting effect upon the water, which rushes with considerable violence through the Bridge. These mills, with the causeway, were founded by earl Lupus, and descended to his successors: they were afterwards held by the earls of Chester, of the royal line. Edward the Black Prince granted them to sir Howel y-Fwyall, in reward for his bravery at the battle of Poitiers, where he took the French king prisoner. The revenue of the mills

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