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Antiquarian mit Topographical Cabinet, from & Drawing by the Ber

Cross, Somersby, Lincolnshire.

Published for the Proprimors. by W. Clarke, New Bond & and I Carpenter Old Bond St Apt 192.

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NOMERSBY is small... w the hun he or Fill, and parts of Lindey, ip Es suurty of Lincm, »duate Fa les northwest from cong tle, and spra' dormle north-west from Spikes

bitants, returned at de G » dreticus of the

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act in 1801. amounted wily to seventy-six; the ov raised in 1803, on a patcave of 2. 5d, in the pound, scarcely exceeded £58.

The living is a discard rectory, valued on the King's books at 24:18, 54 nd hus poväte parsing da The church, dedicated to St Margaris.

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CROSS AT SOMERSBY,

LINCOLNSHIRE.

SOMERSBY is a small village in the hundred of Hill, and parts of Lindsey, in the county of Lincoln, situate six miles north-east from Horncastle, and an equal distance north-west from Spilsby. The number of resident inhabitants, returned under the directions of the population act in 1801, amounted only to seventy-six; the money raised in 1803, on a parish rate of 2s. 5d. in the pound, scarcely exceeded £53.

The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4:16:5, and has private patronage. The church, dedicated to St. Margaret, is a small stone building, with a low square tower, without one single trait to draw the attention of the antiquary, or employ the pencil of the artist; but though the church is thus destitute of interest, the precinct with which it is inclosed, contains a curiosity, well worthy of being preserved, in the stone Cross at Somersby, now (1806) standing in a state of perfect originality in front of the south side of the church, rather inclining east from the porch, as represented in the annexed Print; the extreme height, including the subcourse, on which rests the base, is fif

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