The Chronology of Words and Phrases: A Thousand Years in the History of English

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Kyle Cathie, 1999 - 269 pages
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After reaching America, Columbus introduced Europe to new foodstuffs such as chilli and chocolate, and the words that described them. Pope Boniface VIII proclaimed the first "jubilee" in 1300, and Francis Bacon published the first "essay" in 1597. The Normans gave us the "feudal system" and "curfews," while the flourishing of Dutch art in the 17th century introduced "easels," "etchings," and "landscapes." Thus, throughout history, events great and small have left their mark on the way we speak. Starting from 1066 and working through to the present-day boom in techno-speak, this book links hundreds of words with the historical upheavals and minor social changes which gave them life.

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CHRONOLOGY OF WORDS & PHRASES

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Two chief features distinguish this etymological study: a chronological scheme highlighting the impact of historical events on language, and an emphasis on terms stemming from inventions and other ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
11
The Normans begin to erect castles
17
The construction of Canterbury Cathedral is begun
23
Copyright

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