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ILLUSTRATIONS.

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FIGURE OF ST. MARGARET, FROM MARTON PRIORY.

to face 49 KILTON CASTLE :Plan of Kilton Castle

102 The North-East Tower.—North Front

114 The North-East Tower.-East Front

116 Window in Basement of North-East Tower

118 Fireplace in Basement of North-East Tower.

123 ROMAN TOMBSTONE AT YORK.

127 PHOTO OF SWORD DUG UP NEAR WAKEFIELD

128 SPECIMENS FOUND IN THE ANGLIAN CEMETERY AT HOB Hill, NEAR SALTBURN

to face 132 HERALDIC GLASS FROM INGLEBY ARNCLIFFE AND KIRBY SIGSTON CHURCHES : Arms of Fauconberg

to face 137 Arms of St. Quintin

137 Arms of Colville

138 Arms of Wassand

139 Arms of Sigston, in the Aisle Window of Kirby Sigston Church .

139 PLAN OF SUPPOSED ROMAN CAMP NEAR HARROGATE to face 145 HAREWOOD CASTLE, DETAILS AT

177 BRONZE RING, FOUND NEAR GIGGLESWICK

237 BRIDLINGTON PRIORY : CLOISTER ARCADE (two plates) to face 238 THE MANOR-HOUSE OF THE BISHOPS OF DURHAM AT HOWDEN :

Plan of the Remains of the Bishops' Manor House,
Howden

to face 257 Porch to the Hall, from North-west

263 Key of Vault of Porch

263 West End of Hall

264 Langley's Gateway, North Side

264 View showing Buildings on West and North Sides of Court

266

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AN EXCAVATION AT ADEL :-Plan and Sections, Adel Camp to face 288

AN UNRECORded Brass at BOSSALL, IN the North Riding :-
Robert Constable, esq., chancellor of Durham, 1454

THE CASTLES OF THE NORTH RIDING :

Plan of Cropton, Castleton, Castle Leavington, and
Easby Castle .

Helmsley Castle .

Foss, Feliskirk, and Killerby Castles

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to face 336

352

358

Middleham (William's Hill) and Northaller-
ton (Castle Hills and Bishops' Palace)
Castles

Pickering and Pickhill, Castles, and
Pickering (Beacon Hill) .

to face 366

Sheriff Hutton and Topcliffe Castles.
Skelton Castle

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Skelton Castle from the N.N.W

Skelton Castle in 1762

Whorlton and Yafforth Castles.

Map of North Riding of Yorkshire

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CORRIGENDA ET ADDENDUM.

Page 55n, Col. 1, last line. For J. G. Clark read G. T. Clark.

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229.

66

Add after line 15:—Henry le Scrope, chamberlain 1346 and bailiff

1349-50, was still living in 1394. Free of the city of York in 1342 as

Henricus le Skrope de Manfeld.” In 1377 the city chamberlains received 45. rent de “Henrico de Manfeld pro terris Galfridi Lescrop super Byshopeshill (Corp. Records, A.y., p. 3). On 25 April, 1394, John de Manfeld, rector of a mediety of St. Mary's Bishophill senior, bequeathed the residue of his estate “Henrico de Manfeld consanguineo meo," to Julian his wife, and to Alice, daughter of the said Henry de Manfeld (Reg. Test., i, fo. 65b). Julian was the daughter of John de Briggenhall [Brignall], of York, whose brother, Richard de B., mercer, free in 1337, died in 1362, leaving an only child, Agnes, who by deed made 9 July, 1366, in the church of St. Mary-in-the-Strand, London, gave all her property in York to Henry de Manfeld of that city.

ROBt. H. SKAIFE.

THE

Yorkshire Archäological Journal.

THE CHURCH IN RIPON.1

By Rev. CANON J. T. FOWLER, D.C.L., F.S.A.

We know comparatively little of the Church in Ireland before the fifth century, in Scotland before the sixth, or in England before the seventh century. St. Augustine came over from Rome to the south of England in 597, and St. Aidan from Iona to the north in 635. The known history of Ripon begins about twenty-five years after this, for about 660 a Celtic monastery was founded here by Alchfrid, prince of Deira, Eata being the first abbot. This old abbey, according to Leland, stood on lower ground than the present Minster, about two hundred yards away to the north, where was afterwards a Chapel of Our Lady, whence the name of the street, St. Mary Gate, which forms the eastern boundary of the site. Here St. Cuthbert held the office of guestmaster, and on a certain occasion ministered to the necessities of a mysterious guest, who was supposed to have been an angel. These earliest monks brought with them from Lindisfarne the Celtic traditions with regard to the time of keeping Easter, the form of the tonsure, and other matters in which the Celtic traditions differed from those of Rome that were introduced by Roman missionaries.

Now about 664, only four years after its foundation, this first monastery was bestowed by Alchfrid upon his friend Wilfrid5, who had been to Rome, indeed he is said to have been the first Englishman to visit the Eternal City, and he came back full of Roman ideas. He was a man of great ability and determination, and insisted on the Roman Easter, tonsure, etc., being

1 This paper was read before the Yorkshire Archæological Society in the Minster on July 12th, 1911, but as some matters had to be passed over for want of time, these and other additions are here included, together with references to authorities.

4

2

* Bede, Vit. S. Cuthb., vii; Memorials of Ripon, i, 2. 3 Itin., 1745, i, 89; M.R., i, 83.

Bede, Vit. s. C., vii; M.R., i, 2; Metrical Life of S. C., 42.

5 Bede, Hist. Eccl. iii, xxv; M.R., i, 3.

6 Ripon Psalter, Whitham's ed., p. 6. Eddii Vita, cap. 3.

А

VOL. XXII.

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