University Lectures Delivered by Members of the Faculty in the Free Public Lecture Course, Volume 2; Volumes 1914-1915

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The University, 1915

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Page 153 - Tis strange, — but true ; for truth is always strange; Stranger than fiction : if it could be told, How much would novels gain by the exchange ! How differently the world would men behold...
Page 261 - TO THE READER. This Figure, that thou here seest put, It was for gentle Shakespeare cut ; Wherein the Graver had a strife , With Nature, to out-doo the life: O, could he but have drawne his wit As well in brasse, as he hath hit His face ; the print would then surpasse All that was ever writ in brasse. But, since he cannot, Reader, looke Not on his Picture, but his Booke.
Page 589 - It is, of course, too early to forecast the means of attaining this last result; but the policy of the government of the United States is to seek a solution which may bring about permanent safety and peace to China, preserve Chinese (erritorial and administrative entity, protect all rights guaranteed to friendly powers by treaty and international law, and safeguard for the world the principle of equal and impartial trade with all parts of the Chinese Empire.
Page 249 - O, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost thence my nature is subdued To what it works in, like the dyer's hand.
Page 154 - All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. At first the infant, Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms. And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel And shining morning face, creeping like snail Unwillingly to school. And then the lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad Made to his mistress
Page 318 - We, greatly commending, and graciously accepting of, their desires for the furtherance of so noble a work, which may, by the Providence of Almighty God, hereafter tend to the glory of his Divine Majesty, in propagating of Christian religion to such people, as yet live in darkness and miserable ignorance of the true knowledge and worship of God, and may in time bring the Opinion.
Page 587 - free ports'), no matter to what nationality it may belong, and that duties so leviable shall be collected by the Chinese government. "Third. That it will levy no higher harbor dues on vessels of another nationality frequenting any port in such 'sphere...
Page 587 - That the Chinese treaty tariff of the time being shall apply to all merchandise landed or shipped to all such ports as are within said 'sphere of interest...
Page 259 - O sweet Mr. Shakespeare! I'll have his picture In my study at the court . . . Let the dunclflede age esteem of Spenser and Chaucer, I'll worship sweet Mr.
Page 182 - To recognize the Indian ownership of the limitless prairies and forests of this continent — that is, to consider the dozen squalid savages who hunted at long intervals over a territory of a thousand square miles as owning it outright — necessarily implies a similar recognition of the claims of every white hunter, squatter, horse-thief, or wandering cattleman.

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