Journal, Volume 2

Front Cover
1833
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Contents

Tibetan Text ANNA
58
Dr Richardsons Route from Ava to Kendát
70
Trisection of an Angle
70
Trisection of an Angle By Lieut Nasmyth Morrieson W S
71
Note on Saline Deposits in Hydrabad By Assistant Surgeon J Malcolm
77
Proceedings of the Asiatic Society
91
Systematically arranged Catalogue of the Mammalia and Birds belonging
97
Meteorological Table for February
104
MARCH
105
Abstracts of Observations of the Temperature Pressure and Hygrometri
128
Expansion of Metals 182
131
Continuation of Dr Gerards Route with Lieut Burnes from Bokhára
143
Proceedings of the Asiatic Society
149
Miscellaneous
156
List of Indian Woods collected by N Wallich M D F R S Correspond
167
Table for Ascertaining the Heights of Mountains from the boiling point
194
Translation of a Tibetan Passport dated A D 1688 By M Alex Csoma
201
Meteorological Register for April
216
Description of Bokhára By Lieut A Burnes Bombay Army Assistant
224
On the Climate of Nagpúr By W Geddes Surgeon Mad Eur Reg
239
Table shewing the Rise of Spring Tides in Bombay Harbour during night
247
Description of a Sun Dial in the Court of the Moti Masjid in the Fort
251
Description of a Compensation Barometer and Observations on
258
Turpentine Still c 219
267
Meteorological Register for
272
Report on the Geology of Hyderabad By H H Voysey Esq Surgeon
298
On the reputed Descendants of Alexander the Great in the Valley of
305
Astronomical Observations at Barelly By H S Boulderson Esq
318
Bactrian Coins Pl VII
318
Notice of Analysis of the Ashes of four Indian Plants By Ditto
322
Meteorological Register for June
328
Description of the Panchaki or Native Watermill
359
Delhi Water Mill
364
Proceedings of the Asiatic Society
367
Geological Section through Hyderabad 304
370
V1 Miscellaneous
374
Analysis of Books Taylors Astronomical Observation at Madras
380
Meteorological Register for July
384
Second Report on the Geology of Hyderabad By H W Voysey
392
Bactrian and IndoScythic Coinscontinued By James Prinsep F R
405
Bactrian Coins Pl VIII
416
Note on the Zoology of the 2nd Part of the Transactions of the Physical
417
Note on the extraordinary Fall of the Barometer during the Gale of the 21st
427
Chemical Analyses By James Prinsep Sec c
434
An Inquiry into the Laws governing the two great powers Attraction
506
Pl Xli
538
Iron Suspension Bridge
540
Additional Note on the Climate of Nagpúr By J Prinsep Sec As Soe e
542
Proceedings of the Asiatic Society
546
Analysis of Books
551
Miscellaneous 1 Circular Instructions from the Geological Society for the Collection of Geological Specimens
557
Mirrors of Fusible Alloy
559
Meteorological Register for September
560
NOVEMBER 1 On the Colossal Idols of Bamián By Lieut Alexander Burnes Bombay Army
561
Account of the Earthquake at Kathmandú By A Campbell Esq Assistant Surgeon attached to the Residency
564
Census of the Population of the City and District of Murshedabad taken in 1829
567
List of Birds collected in the Jungles of Borabhúm and Dholbhúm By Lieut S R Tickell 31st Regt N I
569
Note on the Fossil Bones discovered near Jabalpúr By J Prinsep Sec As Soc
583
Report on a Collection of Objects of Natural History By the Curator of the Museum of the Asiatic Society
588
Note on the Genus Spiraculum By J T Pearson Curator As Soc
590
On the Kukumb ka Tel or concrete Oil of the Wild Mangosteen
592
Note on the Coal discovered at Khyúk Phyú in the Arracan District
595
Analysis of Books Transactions of the Batavian Society
597
Miscellaneous 1 Register of the Temperature of Ghazipúr By the Rev R Everest
604
Note on the Salájit of Nipal
605
Summary Sketch of the Geology of India
606
Meteorological Register for Nov 1833
608
DECEMBER 1 A short Account of the Charak Puja Ceremonies and Description of the
609
Specimens of some Ornamental Forms of Persian Writing By Mahá Rájá Káli Kishen Behadúr of Calcutta
613
Description of an Indian Balance called Tula By the same
615
Notes on the Specimens of the Kankar Formation and on Fossil Bones col lected on the Jamna By Captain E Smith Bengal Engineers
622
Kankar Formation in Slabs
624
Sections of Jamna Banks
627
Jamna Fossil Bones
632
Further particulars of the Earthquake in Nipal By A Campbell Esq Assistant Surgeon attached to the Residency
636
Note on the Fossil Palms and Shells lately discovered on the Tableland
639
Sagar in Central India By H H Spry Esq Bengal Medical Service
639
Site of the Ságar Fossils
640
Meteorological Register at Barelly in 1831 By H S Boulderson Esq
641
Proceedings of the Asiatic Society
645
Miscellaneous 1 Note on the Tailor Birds Nest By Lieut Gifford
648
Note on the Inscription on the Hindu Coins Plate VIII Fig 15
649
Fall of Fish from the Sky
650
Fossil Shells near Herat
652
Cochineal ib 8 Reply to the Questions of the Burmese Philosopher Prince
653
Cave of Secanderiah near Tabriz
658
Meteorological Register for December 1833
660
367
661

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Page 285 - And when the king came in to see the guests, he saw there a man which had not on a wedding garment: and he saith unto him, Friend, how earnest thou in hither not having a wedding garment? And he was speechless. Then said the king to the servants. Bind him hand and foot, and take him away, and cast him into outer darkness; there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.
Page 457 - It seems possible, to account for all the phenomena of heat, if it be supposed, that in solids the particles are in a constant state of vibratory motion , the particles of the hottest bodies moving with the greatest velocity, and through the greatest space ; that in fluids and elastic fluids, besides the vibratory motion, which must be conceived greatest in the last, the particles have a motion round their own axes, with different velocities, the particles of elastic fluids moving with the greatest...
Page 560 - It occupies a front of 70 feet; and the niche in which it is excavated, extends about that depth into the hill. This idol is mutilated ; both legs having been fractured by cannon ; and the countenance above the mouth is destroyed. The lips are very large ; the ears long and pendent ; and there appears to have been a tiara on the head. The figure is covered by a mantle, which hangs over it in all parts, and has been formed of a kind of plaster ; the image having been studded with wooden pins in various...
Page 216 - Kshatriyas, wear the thread, and assume the patronymic title. The original .Khas, thus favoured by it, became soon and entirely devoted to the Brahmanical system.* The progress of Islam below daily poured fresh refugees among them. They availed themselves of the superior knowledge of the strangers to subdue the neighbouring tribes of aborigines, were successful beyond their hopes, and, in such a career continued for ages...
Page 457 - ... substances the particles move round their own axes, and separate from each other, penetrating in right lines through space. Temperature may be conceived to depend upon the velocities of the vibrations ; increase of capacity on the motion being performed in greater space; and the diminution of temperature during the conversion of solids into...
Page 457 - The immediate cause of the phenomena of heat then is motion, and the laws of its communication are precisely the same, as the laws of the communication of motion.
Page 457 - Rumford's experiments, the same piece of metal may be kept hot for any length of time ; so that if heat be pressed out, the quantity must be inexhaustible. When any body is cooled, it occupies a smaller volume than before : it is evident, therefore, that its parts must have approached...
Page 507 - If in two large tall cylindrical Vessels of Glass inverted, two little Thermometers be suspended so as not to touch the Vessels, and the Air be drawn out of one of these Vessels, and these Vessels thus prepared be carried out of a cold place into a warm one; the Thermometer in vacuo will grow warm as much, and almost as soon as the Thermometer which is not in vacuo.
Page 507 - ... and easy transmission? And do not the vibrations of this medium in hot bodies contribute to the intenseness and duration of their heat? And do not hot bodies communicate their heat to contiguous cold ones, by the vibrations of this medium propagated from them into the cold ones?
Page 313 - In the onset, however, we are disappointed to find that none of the recorded names of the Bactrian kings at all resemble that before us ; yet there can be no doubt about any letter but that preceding KOT, which may be either...

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