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AUTHOR OF THE ENCYCLOPEDIAS OF GARDENING AND OF AGRICULTURE, AND
EDITOR OF THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PLANTS.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR

LONGMAN, REES, ORME, BROWN, GREEN, AND LONGMAN,

PATERNOSTER-ROW.

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PREFACE.

THE Contents of this Eighth Volume of the Gardener's Magazine
show that the work continues to answer the purposes for which it
was commenced, viz. those of collecting scattered fragments of
information on the various departments of gardening on which it
treats; giving an account of the progress which the art is making
in various parts of the world, and more especially in Britain; and
bringing minds into collision, which, probably, would not other-
wise have known of each other's existence.

The grand characteristics of the present times are union and
cooperation for general improvement. Those engaged in arts and
occupations which admit of their congregating together in towns
feel no difficulty in assembling, and communicating their different
discoveries and wants: hence the advantages which are daily
resulting from scientific societies and mechanics' institutions.
The gardener and the farmer, however, have but slender oppor-
tunities of improving themselves, or benefiting others, by attend-
ance at such associations; and must necessarily be, in a great
measure, precluded from the advantages which result from belong-
ing to them. The principal medium of communication of all such
persons is, therefore, the press; and the probability is, that, with
the progress of human improvement, every description of rural
art or trade (if not all arts and trades whatever) will have its own
particular Newspaper or Magazine. The idea has been already
suggested in the Scotsman newspaper, and in the New Monthly
Magazine. It is in consequence of the want of personal inter-
course, or the means of communication through the press, that
the country population are, in intelligence and enterprise, com-
paratively behind those whose pursuits admit of their residing
in towns; and, of all classes of country residents, agricultural
labourers are generally the most deficient in moral and intellec-
tual improvement.
The cause is, that no other class is so com-
pletely isolated from the rest of society. Till lately, this has
been, to a considerable degree, also the case with gardeners: and

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