Universal Geography, Or, a Description of All Parts of the World, on a New Plan, According to the Great Natural Divisions of the Globe: America and adjacent islands

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Wells and Lilly, 1826
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Contents

The branch CasiquiareLakes without any outlet
362
Elevation of the Andes of QuitoStructure and Geologi
368
Region of the CinchonaRegion of the Grasses and Oaks
374
BOOK LXXXVII
380
ProductionsImportance of the Oronoko
387
Climate and TemperaturesRiversTemperature
393
Towns on the IsthmusTowns on the North or Atlantic
400
Provinces on the UraguayNative TribesTowns
401
PichinchaCotopaxi
406
Muyxan Calendar
412
Vegetable and Animal ProductionsWool
417
Towns of PeruEarthquakesCuzco 424
424
Bridge of RushesTowns of Southern Peru
431
Beard of the Americans 16
433
Decrease of Population
437
Immortality of the SoulMetempsychosis
443
Missions of the Jesuits 462
446
PlantsAnimalsProvinces and Towns 449
449
Paraguay or Buenos AyresAspect of the Country
456
Complaints against the JesuitsCommerce of the Jesuits
463
WarfareReligionCustoms 469
469
Comarca DesertaCountry of the Cesares
475
Terra del Fuego
481
AdministrationSystem of Administration
487
Annual Produce of the Mines in Spanish America at the
493
SlaveryLiberty of the PressPublic Instruction
499
Supreme DirectorIndependence of the Colonists
501
BOOK XCI
507
TorrentsClimateThe Interior
513
Gold Mines 519
519
Rapidity of their GrowthPlants used in Dyeing
525
Comarcas and Towns
538
Mattagrosso
544
Actual State of BrazilTotal PopulationThe Court
550
Name of the CountryCoastLow Grounds 553
553
Ant BearsCancrophagus
559
BOOK XCIII
567
MineralsVegetablesArmyPrincipal Towns
576
TownsTomb of Columbus Bay of SamanaFrench Settle
582
DANISH ANTILLESSt Thomas
588
PopulationVolcanoesProductionsTowns
590
Towns and Harbours
596
A Hurricane
603
The Quarterons and QuinteronsPrerogatives of the Whites
613

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Popular passages

Page 222 - If you tell an Indian that his children have greatly signalized themselves against an enemy, have taken many scalps, and brought home many prisoners, he does not appear to feel any strong emotions of pleasure on the occasion ; his answer generally is —
Page 220 - They are not even permitted to speak, but must convey whatever they have to impart to each other by signs and motions. They now proceed wholly by stratagem and ambuscade. Having discovered their enemies, they send to reconnoitre them; and a council is immediately held, during which they speak only in whispers, to consider of the intelligence imparted by those who were sent out.
Page 12 - Their beard is thin, and grows in tufts. Their forehead is low, and their eyes are lengthened out, with the outer angles turned up towards the temples ; the eyebrows high, the cheek-bones prominent; the nose a little flattened, but well marked ; the lips extended, and their teeth closely set and pointed.
Page 545 - The dress of the men consists of a waistcoat and a pair of drawers ; that of the women, of a chemise and petticoat, with a handkerchief tied round the head, after the fashion of the Portuguese females. They...
Page 220 - ... within bow-shot of those they have destined to destruction. On a signal given by the chief warrior, to which the whole body makes answer by the most hideous yells, they all start up, and, discharging their arrows in the same instant, without giving their adversaries time to recover from the confusion into which they are thrown, pour in upon them with their warclubs or tomahawks. The Indians think there is little glory to be acquired from attacking their enemies openly in the field ; their greatest...
Page ii - Co. of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit : " Tadeuskund, the Last King of the Lenape. An Historical Tale." In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States...
Page 571 - Clouds are seldom seen in the sky ; the heat of the sun is only rendered supportable by the sea breeze, which blows regularly from the south-east during the greater part of the day. The nights are calm and serene, the moon shines more brightly than in Europe, and emits a light that enables man to read the smallest print ; its absence is in some degree compensated by the planets, and above all by the luminous effulgence of the galaxy.
Page 308 - During the time it was exposed, he adds, ' 'the court of the University was crowded with people, most of whom expressed the most decided anger and contempt. Not so, however, all the Indians. I attentively marked their countenances; not a smile escaped them, or even a word — all was silence and attention. In reply to a joke of one of the students, an old Indian remarked, 'It is true we have three very good Spanish gods, but we might still have been allowed to keep a few of those of our ancestors.
Page 603 - Frequent changes take place in the thermometer, which rises sometimes from eighty to ninety degrees.* Darkness extends over the earth; the higher regions gleam with lightning. The impending storm is first observed on the sea, foaming mountains rise suddenly from its clear and motionless surface. The wind rages with unrestrained fury ; its noise may be compared to the distant thunder.
Page 6 - They behold the paramos, or mountain ridges, covered with snow, which continues upon some of the summits almost the whole year, while, at the distance of a few leagues, an intense and often sickly degree of heat suffocates the inhabitants of the ports of Vera Cruz and of Guayaquil. These two climates produce each a different system of vegetation. The flora of the torrid zone forms a border to the fields and groves of Europe. Such a remarkable proximity as this cannot fail of frequently occasioning...