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which sends hops, and fruits, and other good things to the London markets; and which too evidently excited the envy of the man of East Kent, at the time he drew up his Report. He therefore got rid of it, in the above ungracious

manner.

P. 3. "The Weald of Kent, before mentioned, was for merly covered entirely with woods. It has now many small towns and villages; but is more thinly inhabited than the other parts of the county, and of course much less cultivated."

P. 9. "The Weald. This district of the county was in ancient times an immense wood or forest, inhabited only by herds of deer and hogs, and belonged wholly to the King. By degrees it became peopled, and interspersed with villages and towns; and by piece-meal, was for the most part cleared of its wood, and converted into tillage and pasture. There are, however, some woodlands still in their original state,"

P. 8. “Romney-Marsh is an extensive tract of rich marshland, at the south corner of the county, originally inclosed from the sea, by a strong wall thrown up between the towns of Romney and Hythe."

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P. 10. Romney Marsh is a spacious level of exceedingly rich land, lying at the south corner of the county. Its shape is nearly that of a parallelogram, whose length from the foot of the hill at Aldington to the sea-shore, between Dengeness and Rye, is about twelve miles; and breadth, from the borders of the Weald of Kent by Warehorn, to the sea-shore, between Romney and Dimchurch, is nearly eight miles.".

P. 11. "This marsh is defended from the sea by an im mense bank of earth (called Dimchurch Wall) of more thani three miles in length. The face next the sea is covered with common faggot-wood, and hop-poles fastened dowa by oak piles and overlaths, which prevent the sea from washing away the earth. The support of the wall, and the drainage of this marsh, amount to the sum of four thou sand pounds per annum; which sum is raised by a scot per acre, on the whole level of Romney Marsh."

CLIMATURE.-P. 12. "The proximity to the German Ocean and British Channel, renders this county very sub. ject to cold sea-winds, which often, near the shore in the spring of the year, injure the tender shoots of corn and herbage of every kind; especially when, after a few days of fine warm weather, a north-east wind succeeds..

"The prevailing winds of this county are, north-east and south-west. When the former sets in and continues for any length of time, which is often the case in winter, a severe frost is always the consequence; the air is them exceedingly

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vicinity of the towns of Faversham, Sandwich, and Desi, is mostly arable, extremely fertile, and under the most excellent system of management; which will be described in its proper place."

These are, legitimately, and honestly, passages of East Kent. Those rich but no way beautiful passages, with the eastern compartment of the Chalk Hills, the confined Dis trict of Canterbury, and the District of Thanet, are all that East Kent can rightfully claim. Extending it further, westward, is robbery.

P. 6. "The Isle of Shepey is separated from the rest of the county by an arm of the sea, called the Swale, navigable for ships of 200 tons burthen. It is said to have derived its name from the number of sheep that were continually feeding on it. It is about eleven miles in length, and eight in its greatest breadth."

P. 8. "The western part of this county consists of a great variety of soils and systems of management. It is much more inclosed than the eastern part, and produces more timber and underwood.

"The best cultivated is the north side of the district, from Rainham to Dartford: a tract of five or six miles in breadth. Parallel to this is a space of like breadth, of exceeding cold, stiff, flinty clay, which is generally ploughed with six horses: this is the flat top of the chalk-hill that runs from the sea, by Folkstone, through the county, to the borders of Surrey, near Westerham. The soil of this slip of land is nearly alike, and is but of small value, on ac count of the great expence of cultivation.

"It is the highest land in the county, and is, from thence, by some called The Hog's Back of Kent. Between this hill and the borders of the Weald and county of Surrey, is an inclosed country, with much gentle bill and dale, the hills shelving in almost every direction, with several varieties of the ragstone soils. This part produces great quantities of hops and fruit, with some corn and grass; also timber and un derwood, and has many pieces of common and waste land *."

Now to deem the above passage invidious only, would be an act of lenity toward its writer. The part of Kent which lies to the south of the said "Hog's Back"-the Turnbridge quarter-is the least estimable part of the County. It is the rich and beautiful district, situated on the southward of the middle division of the Chalk Hills, which

The inhabitants divide the county into three parts, East, Middle, and West Kent; and, according to the ancient provincial adage, West Kent is healthy, but not wealthy; East Kent is wealthy, but not healthy? but Middle Kent is both healthy and wealthy.

Note by a Middle Kent Farmer.
-Editor."

"Perhaps more fanciful than true.

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which sends hops, and fruits, and other good things to the London markets; and which too evidently excited the envy of the man of East Kent, at the time he drew up his Report. He therefore got rid of it, in the above ungracious

manner.

→P. 3. "The Weald of Kent, before mentioned, was for merly covered entirely with woods. It has now many small towns and villages; but is more thinly inhabited than the other parts of the county, and of course much less culti vated."

P. 9. "The Weald. This district of the county was in an cient times an immense wood or forest, inhabited only by herds of deer and hogs, and belonged wholly to the Kingi By degrees it became peopled, and interspersed with villages and towns; and by piece-meal, was for the most part cleared of its wood, and converted into tillage and pasture. There are, however, some woodlands still in their original state," P. 8. Romney-Marsh is an extensive tract of rich marsh land, at the south corner of the county, originally inclosed from the sea, by a strong wall thrown up between the towns of Romney and Hythe.'

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P. 10. Romney Marsh is a spacious level of exceedingly rich land, lying at the south corner of the county. Its shape is nearly that of a parallelogram, whose length from the foot of the hill at Aldington to the sea-shore, between Dengeness and Rye, is about twelve miles; and breadth, from the borders of the Weald of Kent by Warehorn, to the sea-shore, between Romney and Dimchurch, is nearly eight miles."'".

P. 11. "This marsh is defended from the sea by an im mense bank of earth (called Dimchurch Wall) of more than three miles in length. The face next the sea is covered with common faggot-wood, and hop-poles fastened dowa by oak piles and overlaths, which prevent the sea from washing away the earth. The support of the wall, and the drainage of this marsh, amount to the sum of four thou sand pounds per annum; which sum is raised by a scot per acre, on the whole level of Romney Marsh."

CLIMATURE.-P. 12. "The proximity to the German Ocean and British Channel, renders this county very sub. ject to cold sea-winds, which often, near the shore in the spring of the year, injure the tender shoots of corn and herb age of every kind; especially when, after a few days of fine warm weather, a north-east wind succeeds..

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"The prevailing winds of this county are, north-east and south-west. When the former sets in and continues for any length of time, which is often the case in winter, a severe frost is always the consequence; the air is them exceedingly

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exceedingly keen and sharp; ponds are frozen to the depth of ten or twelve inches; and turnips are destroyed. The south-west part of the county is more inclosed; and, being under shelter of the ridge of hills running from Folkstone-hill to Wrotham, &c. is somewhat warmer as to climate; but the soil in this part being much of it a cold moist clay, the harvest is later than in those parts of the county which are more exposed to the winds before mentioned.

"The effect of the climate on Agriculture will perhaps be best shown, by stating the time when the wheat har vest commences; which, in the most early parts of the county (viz. the Isles of Shepey and Thanet) is, in a very forward harvest, by the 20th of July, and in general in the last week of that month; in East Kent, between Canter, bury and Dover, about six or seven days later, according to soil and situation; and still later, by ten or twelve days, on the cold hills which run through the middle of the county."

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This may be truly deemed satisfactory Report;-except ing, perhaps, what regards the time of harvest; which appears to be put rather too early.

SOILS.-Thanet.-P. 4. "Much of the Isle of Thanet was naturally very thin light land;" (!) "but the greater part of it having belonged to the Religious, who were the wealthiest and most intelligent people, and the best farmers of the time, no pains or cost were spared to improve the soil. The sea furnished an inexhaustible supply of manure, which was brought by the tides to all the borders of the upland, quite round the island; and most likely was liberally and judiciously applied by the Monks and their tenants; and their successors to the present time, have not neglected to profit by their example. Owing to these circumstances, Thanet always was, and most likely always will be, famous for its fertility; and the Monkish tale of Thanet's deriving its superior fruitfulness from its having been the asylum of St. Augustine, is not so far from the truth as it may at first appear. Old historians said, Felix tellus Tanet sua fecunditate;' and modern writers of husbandry speak of it as one of the finest gardens in the kingdom.

"In short, is there another district in Great Britain, or in the world, of the same extent, in such a state of culti vation, where the farmers are so wealthy and intelligent, where land, naturally of so inferior a quality," (!) "is let for so much money, and produces such abundant crops?"

Who, reading the above notice, might not be led to believe that the rich soils of the "Isle of Thanet" were a creation of “ Monks and their tenants"?-Nothing but a

mind darkly blinded, or much deranged, by prejudice, could have engendered such an enthusiastic idea. The dis trict of Thanet is, naturally, a singularly well soiled chalky swell. An inconsiderable extent of its uppermost lands, is somewhat thinly soiled, as are the highest "downs" of other chalk hills. But the soils of the middle and lower stages, and especially of the lowest margin, or base, are, evidently, in their aboriginal nature, deep, rich, calcareous loams; such as are found on the lower skirts of other chalk hills; tho rarely of so good a quality *:—a fact, this, which even the Reporter, in a more lucid moment, would seem to have been aware of.

P. 13. "The bottom soil of the whole island, or what modern writers in husbandry call the subsoil, is a dry, hard, rock chalk. The tops of the ridges are about sixty feet above the level of the sea, and are covered with a dry, loose, chalky mould, from four to six inches deep: it has a mixture of small flints, and is, without manure, a very poor soil. The vales between the ridges and the flat lands on the hills, have a depth of dry loamy soil, from one to three feet, with less chalk, and of much better quality.

"The west end of the island, even on the hills, has a good mould, from one to two feet deep, a little inclining to stiffness; but the deepest and best soil is that which lies on the south side of the southernmost ridge, running westward from Ramsgate to Monkton: it is there a deep rich sandy loam, and mostly dry enough to be ploughed flat, without any water-furrows."

Taking it, all in all, the district of Thanet is naturally the deepest soiled, most valuable passage of chalk hill, in this island.

Soils of the other Districts of East Kent.-P. 13. "The open part of the district between Canterbury, Dover, and Deal, is of various soils, no one parish or farm being perfectly similar in all its parts. The principal soils are, 1st, Chalk; 2d, Loam; 3d, strong Cledge; 4th, Hazel Mould; 5th, stiff Clay. Besides these, there are some small tracts of flints, gravel, and sand.

"The chalk-soils are of various depths; from three to six or seven inches of loose, chalky mould, on a rock chalk Bottom, and are mostly found on the tops and sides of the ridges of this district. At some piaces there is a little mix⚫ture of small flints, and at others, of black light mould, provincially called Black Hover. This last, in an unimproved state, is the worst land in this district,'

P. 14.

-" See my SOUTHERN COUNTIES District, Isle of Thanet.

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