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What render the book still more bulky and expensive, are ten large folding tables, regarding the political character of the principal towns, &c.

Mr. Vancouver, however, has not been an idle spectator, in Hampshire. There are many subjects on which he treats with commendable intelligence. What serve to interrupt, and tend to annoy, the agricultural reader, are the irresevant matters which the volume contains ;-the unnecessary attention that is bestowed on points of practice which, now, are well understood;-and an unfortunate display of theoretic arguments, that are urged on unsound bases.

The calculations of profit, on various productions of husbandry, and on different plans of management, are, from the insuperable difficulties attending them, nugatory; and can only disgust experienced cultivators, and lead the inexperienced astray.

The arrangement of the materials is very defective; and the editorship unpardonable; in some instances, perfectly ridiculous; as will appear in the ensuing abstract. Some of the subjects are reported, conjointly, by carrying them on, in concert, through several of the Reporter's districts (eight in number); while others are spoken of distinctly, and some of them, again and again, under different heads. This renders the task of reference and re-examination perplexing; there being no index to direct the enquirer to the object of search.

The number of pages-five hundred and twenty.

A map of the County, colored, or purported to be colored, according to its surface soils.

The subjoined is an extract from the Reporter's "Introduction," which is dated-"Brokenhurst, New Forest, Hants, March, 1808."

"The Survey of the County of Devon being completed, and the Report on the Agriculture, Manufactures, and Commerce of that District delivered over to the Honourable Board of Agriculture; at the desire of the President, Sir John Sinclair, the Surveyor in May last entered upon a similar examination of the County of Hants, in which pursuit he has been closely engaged to the present time."

SUBJECT THE FIRST.

NATURAL ECONOMY.

EXTENT,

IXTENT,—of the Isle of Wight.-P. 3. "Its superficial contents are calculated by the Author from Faden's large map of the county, at 94,000 acres.".

Of

Of the rest of the County.-P. 3. "The area of the other part of the county, deduced from the same authority, is found to contain 1,51248 square miles, or 968, 149, statute acres."

CLIMATURE.-This is one of the items of information that are spoken of, by districts; and is seven times brought forward, within the limits of a few pages. I will transcribe what is said of it under the three principal divisions of the county.

Chalk Hills.-P. 8. "The air, through the whole of this district, is dry, thin, and healthy. The westerly gales are by far the most common and violent; but those from the opposite quarter are found most injurious to fruit, and repressive to vegetation, in the spring and early part of summer."

New Forest.-P. 9. "A great mildness of climate distinguishes the whole of this district. The westerly winds are found to be by far the most common and violent. Along the borders of the Southampton water, agues and fevers still prevail, although by no means so general as they were experienced about twenty years ago."

Isle of Wight.-P. 10. "If we except those places where agues and fevers prevail, and the objections already urged against the climate of the woodlands, these districts exhibit all the variety of climate any where to be experienced in other parts of the county: there being a difference of at least a fortnight in the seasons of the Seventh District, between the red sandy loams on the south side of the Downs, and the light rubbly character of soil which is found high upon the Downs on their north side. The air, through the whole of this island, is favourable to the human constitution: much advantage is annually derived from it to its unhealthy visitors, particularly those afflicted with pulmonary complaints, upon retiring for a short time to its southern borders.

"The Surveyor has much to regret, that, during his whole progress through the county, he was not so fortunate as to meet with, or hear of, a single individual who kept any register of the weather, of the quantity of rain that falls, or any other meteorological tables"

WATERS.-Rivers and Brooks.-P. 7. "The principal rivers which water this couty are the following: The Avon rises in Wiltshire, and enters this county near Fordingbridge, whence it passes through Ringwood, after which it unites with the river Stour in the harbour of Christchurch. The Teste rises in the north part of the county, and running southwards, forms several islands at Stockbridge; thence it passes through Rumsey, and enters the South

ampton

ampton inlet at Redbridge. The Itchen, also called the Abre, has its source at Chilton Candover, near Alresford, whence it pursues a southwardly course through the city of Winchester, thence again southwardly, to its junction with the Southampton water."

Wells and Drinking Pools.-P. 47. “The want of a regular supply of water during the continuance of dry weather, in the chalk districts, is an inconvenience generally experienced, although the little which may be occasionally procured is of the best and most reviving quality. To remedy this evil, ponds are constructed at great labour and expense, for the purpose of retaining the downfall waters, as a supply for both sheep and cattle. These are bedded with the most retentive clay or loam that can be conveniently procured, and paved within and above their upper sides with large smooth flints, as well to prevent poaching in wet weather, as to secure it as much as possible from the action of the frost, which once penetrating the made ground, it becomes porous, and incapable of retaining water until it is again renewed.

"In such situations as are out of the reach of a constant supply of water from brooks, rivulets, or streams, tanks and Jeservoirs are also constructed to receive the rain water from the dwelling-house and buildings; and here wells are sunk from one to three and four hundred feet in depth, through the solid chalk rock, and which in a dry season affords a supply for domestic use, as well as for the sheep and all the farming stock of the occupation. Whole villages are thus frequently supplied with water, drawn up in large buckets by a tread wheel; but even this supply in the month of October will sometimes fail, when all the inconvenience and distress of such a situation may very easily be imagined. In some instances it has been known, that a continuation of dry weather during the autumnal months, and even after the great demand of harvest, will have left more strong beer than water within the boundaries of a parish: in such situations, the labour and expense reqnired to supply the family and a part of the stock with water-carts, is absolutely incalculable; every endeavour, however, is constantly employed to mitigate the evil attendant on the failure of so important a, necessary of life; but which all the high downy parts of the chalk district are to a greater or less extent subjected, that are not visited by water-courses, or lie within the reach of permanently living streams.”.

SOILS.-This, too, is a conjoint subject of districts." It is, first, passed through seven, with climate; and is, then, travelled over the whole eight, alone thus becoming the occupant of more than two sheets of paper.

It is, however, too valuable a part of the volume, to be passed by, without due consideration.-I will first copy the whole of the brief sketches which accompany "Climate," and then extract, from the detailed account, in the section, "Soil," some interesting particulars, relating to the two principal divisions of the County.

"District 1. "(namely, the northern margin of the County, bordering on and uniting with, the lands of Berkshire and Surrey.) P. 8. "Woodlands and the wastes of Bagshot, clay, sand, gravel, and peat; the last found upon the wastes and in some of the enclosed low grounds."

"District 2."-(the Chalk Hills.) P. 8. " Strong flinty loams and hazel-coloured mould on chalk, occasionally veined with gravel: more or less peat in most of the vallies."

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"District 3."-(the eastern margin of the Chalk Hills, uniting with the light barren lands of Surrey and Sussex.)— P. 9. Malm, sand, and gravelly loam, clay and peat: the latter found chiefly upon the wastes; also in Woolmer and in Alice Holt forests."

"District 4."-(the New Forests and its environs.) P. 9. "Light sand and gravelly loams, intermixed with clay and brick-earth on substrata of argillaceous and calcareous marl. Much peat and turf moor prevailing on the heath and low grounds, particularly in the forest of Bere, Waltham Chase, and New Forest."

"District 5."-(the Portsmouth quarter of the County.) -P. 9. "Chalk of Portsdown, and the islands of Portsea and Haling, a strong flinty, and a tender hazel-coloured loam, prevailing in the islands and low grounds."

"District 6."-(certain marginal lands of the Isle of Wight, lying principally on its northern shores, but partly along its southern coast.)-P. 10. " North and south borders of the Isle of Wight, rough strong clay, argillaceous and calcareous marl."

"Districts 7 and 8."-(the interior or main area of the Isle of Wight, which comprizes soils of almost every description.)-P. 10. "Tender, red sand, and gravelly loam, with argillaceous and calcareous marl, chalk, and its usual açcompaniments, red loam and flints."-We now enter upon the

Soils of the Chalk Hills of Hampshire.-P. 15. "Notwithstanding the uniformity prevailing in the internal composition or structure of this district, which chiefly consists of a firm unbroken bed of rock chalk, its soil or surface covering is so much varied and blended with each other, as to require much attention to the describing of it in such a manner as to make all its varieties clearly and distinctly understood.

ampton inlet at Redbridge. The Itchen, also called the Abre, has its source at Chilton Candover, near Alresford, whence it pursues a southwardly course through the city of Winchester, thence again southwardly, to its junction with the Southampton water."

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Wells and Drinking Pools.-P. 47. "The want of a regular supply of water during the continuance of dry weather, in the chalk districts, is an inconvenience generally experienced, although the little which may be occasionally procured is of the best and most reviving quality. To remedy this evil, ponds are constructed at great labour Land expense, for the purpose of retaining the downfall waters, as a supply for both sheep and cattle. These are bedded with the most retentive clay or loam that can be conveniently procured, and paved within and above their upper sides with large smooth flints, as well to prevent poaching in wet weather, as to secure it as much as possible from the action of the frost, which once penetrating the made ground, it becomes porous, and incapable of retaining water until it is again renewed.

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"In such situations as are out of the reach of a constant supply of water from brooks, rivulets, or streams, tanks and reservoirs are also constructed to receive the rain water from the dwelling-house and buildings; and here wells are sunk from one to three and four hundred feet in depth, through the solid chalk rock, and which in a dry season affords a supply for domestic use, as well as for the sheep and all the farming stock of the occupation. Whole vilJages are thus frequently supplied with water, drawn up in large buckets by a tread wheel; but even this supply in the month of October will sometimes fail, when all the inconvenience and distress of such a situation may very easily be imagined. In some instances it has been known, that a continuation of dry weather during the autumnal months, and even after the great demand of harvest, will have left more strong beer than water within the boundaries of a parish : in such situations, the labour and expense reqnired to supply the family and a part of the stock with water-carts, is absolutely incalculable; every endeavour, however, is constantly employed to mitigate the evil attendant on the failure of so important a, necessary of life; but which all the high downy parts of the chalk district are to a greater or less extent subjected, that are not visited by water-courses, or lie within the reach of permanently living streams."

SOILS.-This, too, is a conjoint subject of districts. It is, first, passed through seven, with climate; and is, then, travelled over the whole eight, alone thus becoming the occupant of more than two sheets of paper.

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