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1788. M. Jaques La Fitte

1789.

Madme. Amiot

Madme. Lydie Bocquet

M. Jean Berthon

1789. M. Jean de Blagny

Madme. Catharine Roubel

1790. Madme. Elizabeth Dutens

Madme. Jeanne Lombard
Madme. Rowlandson

M. Pierre Simond

M. Pierre Calmel

M. Duroy

M. Pynyot

M. Bourget

M. Clement

1791. M. G. La Roche

Madme. Suiders

Madlle. Anne Fraigneau

M. P. Debeze

Madlle. Anne Paon

1792. M. Maigre

1804. M. Paul Griffon

Madme. Palairet

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Notes on Hackney Churchyard and some of

its Refugee Monuments,

BY MRS. OGIER-WARD.

(COMMUNICATED BY S. W. KERSHAW, F.S.A.)

THIS ancient graveyard originally formed part of the possessions of the Knights Templars, who built a church on it, dedicated to St Augustine. The Tower, which alone remains, is probably quite 600 years old, as in 1292 A.D. Hackney was recognized as a Vicarage. Like all Templar establishments, it had a good water supply, for within living memory a stream called Hackney Brook was crossed by a bridge opposite the old Tower. The street, on the edge of which this stands, is still called Mare (or Mere) Street, and not far off on the river Lea, are two mills, still called Templars Mills, where, in the reign of Charles II, Prince Rupert used the water power to bore cannon made of the amalgam which he invented. There were also silk mills at Hackney Wick. After the fall of the Templars' Order, their property was all made over to their rivals the Knights of St John of Jerusalem, or Hospitallers, and the ground round it came to be called the "Hospitallers Acre."

In 1521, the Rector (Christopher Urswick) of "the enormous parish of St John-at-Hackney," (it being both a Rectory and Vicarage), who was himself almoner to Henry VIII, had a very wealthy and liberal friend named Heron, who was master of the King's Jewel House, and by him the church was repaired and partially re-built, and it remained much as Heron left it until 1798. This, therefore, was the church which the Huguenots found in existence when they took shelter in England after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, and it was under the shadow of its tower that they laid their dead to rest,

VOL. IV. NO. III,

H

The Churchyard is full of monuments with Huguenot names on them. In 1798 all but the tower of the old church was pulled down, and what recently was still called the "New Church" was built at the other end of the churchyard, near the Clapton Road. This has caused considerable traffic along the public footpath through the burying grounds. The Huguenot immigration was not limited to a few years immediately succeeding the "Revocation;" for more than a century they struggled to obtain concessions that would allow of their living in their native land. Every effort was met by fresh persecution, and followed by the escape of refugees. According to a family tradition, it must have been after 1702 A.D., that one of our ancestors was smuggled over the Channel, concealed in a basket, being under the age at which the cruel decree of Louis XIV allowed Huguenot children to accompany their parents into exile. It is a matter of history that this mad and barbarous policy deprived France of its best industries, and helped on the ruin of the Monarchy. Tradition asserts that in Hackney, "the Huguenots were the making of the place" by their virtuous and industrious habits, and the orderly government of their families and households.

The removel of all the old memorials except the Church tower itself seemed inevitable; the monuments are much dilapidated, and even if all their owners could be found, and were induced to repair them the general aspect of the churchyard would remain that of deplorable neglect; now that it is disused, there are no public funds available for restoring and keeping it in order as a burying-ground. The whole, therefore of the "Hospitallers' Acre" will be taken over by a Society which interests itself in the preservation and care of open spaces in and near London, and the spot will be converted into a garden and recreation ground.

"All inscribed flat stones will be placed level with the ground, and upright ones, if possible, removed against the walls." Such is the decree, and before it is put into execution, it seemed desirable to secure the following copies of the inscription on the two Ogier tombs in this churchyard.

On one at the foot of the Tower, we read as follows;

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ELIZABETH,

their eldest daughter, the wife of
ISAAC ARDESOIF, of Hampstead, Esqre.,
She died 20th October, 1743, in her 19th year.

FRANCIS CREUZE, of Clapton, Esqre.,
died 24th Janry., 1758, aged 64.

ELIZABETH,

Widow of the said FRANCIS CREUZE.
She died 30th Augst., 1766,
Aged 62.

This vault was first made for FRANCIS CREUZE, Esqre., in the year 1743. He was a French Protestant, and escaped from France only with his life in the reign of QUEEN ANNE.

By the blessing of Providence, with industry and integrity, he acquired an ample fortune and for many years resided at Clapton in this Parish, where he died on the 24th Janry., 1758, aged 64.

PETER OGIER,

one of his grandsons, of Lincolns Inn, Barrister-at-law, had this tomb erected over the vault in the year 1833. The above named PETER OGIER, Esqre., died 18th Nov., 1847, aged 77.

Interred in this family vault are the remains of KATHERINE, widow of the late LEWIS OGIER, of Clapton, Esqre., who died in South Carolina, 8th Oct., 1780, aged 61,

and second daughter of FRANCIS and ELIZABETH CREUZE. She died 17th July, 1808, in her 78th year.

ELIZABETH,

The beloved and affectionate wife of PETER OGIER, of Lincolns Inn, Barrister-at-law, and of Eastcott, Middlesex, Esqre., youngest son of the above LEWIS and KATHERINE OGIER. She died 4th Dec., 1832, aged 45, leaving an only son, and husband, to lament the best of wives and kindest of mothers.

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