Choosing White-Collar Crime

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Cambridge University Press, 2005 M11 14 - 232 pages
This systematic application of rational-choice theory to white-collar crime problems distinguishes ordinary and upperworld white-collar crime and presents reasons theoretically for believing that both have increased substantially over time. Reasons for the increase include the growing supply of white-collar lure and non-credible oversight. The book argues that measures and approaches used in the war on street crime have greater promise for reducing white-collar crime. Concluding with reasons for believing that problems of white-collar crime will continue unchecked in the increasingly global economy, it calls for strengthened citizen movements to rein in the increases.

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About the author (2005)

Neal Shover is Professor of Sociology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville where he teaches courses in criminology, white-collar crime and criminal justice. He is author of A Sociology of American Corrections (1979), Aging Criminals (1985), (with Donald A. Clelland and John P. Lynxwiler) Enforcement or Negotiation? Constructing a Regulatory Bureaucracy (1986), (with Werner Einstadter) Analyzing American Corrections (1989), Great Pretenders: Pursuits and Careers of Persistent Thieves (1996) and co-editor (with John Paul Wright) of Crimes of Privilege (2000). His work has appeared in Social Forces, Social Problems, the British Journal of Criminology, Criminology, Crime, Law and Social Change and numerous edited collections.

Andy Hochstetler is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Iowa State University where he teaches courses on crime at the graduate and undergraduate levels as well as a course on inequality and stratification. He writes on white-collar crime, prisoners, criminal decision making and recidivism. His work has appeared in numerous edited collections and journals including Criminology, Social Problems, the Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Crime and Delinquency, Justice Quarterly, the Journal of Criminal Justice, Deviant Behavior and Crime, Law and Social Change.

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