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(ii)

VERSES
Made by the DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM, one
the 20th of Julij, 1665, addrest to his
Mistris. [From an old MS.]
Though Philisyouer preuailinge charmes
Hath forct my Delia frome mine armes,
Thinke not youer conquest to maintaine
By riger or unjust disdayne,

In vaine, fare nimph, in vaine you striue,
For loue douth seldome hope suruiue,
My hearte may languish for a time,
As all Beautyes in theire prime
Haue justifi'd such crueltye,

By the same fate that conquer'd me.
When Age shall come,att whose command
Those troopes of beautye must disbande,
A rivaul's strength once tooke away,
What slaues soe dull as to obey?
But, if you will learne a nobler way,
To keepe this Empire frome decay,
And theire for euer fix youer Thone,
Bee kinde, but kinde to mee alone.

[From the Oxford Herald.]

EDWARD DYER.

A celebrated Poet in Queen Elizabeth's reign, descended from a family of that name in Somersetshire, and educated at Balliol College, Oxford. He was employed in several embassies by Elizabeth, was knighted, and made Chancellor of the Garter. It does not appear that the following specimen of this writer's poetical abilities has ever been published. It is now printed from a MS collection of poems, written about the year 1600.

Amidst the fayrest mountayne topps,
Where Zepherus doth breathe
The pleasant gale, that clothes with
flowres

The valleys underneath,

A shepparde liude, that dearly loude;
Deare Loue, tyme brought to passe
A fforrest nimphe, who was as fayre
As euer woman was.

His thoughtes were higher then the hills
Wherof he had the keepe,

But all his actions innocent,

As humble as his sheepe:

Yet had he powre, but her pure thoughts
Debar'd his powers to rise
Higher then kissinge of her handes,
Or lookinge in her eyes,

One day, (I neede not name the daye
To loouers of their sorrows,

But say, as once a shepparde sayd,

Their mone nights haue no morrows,) He from his sheep-cot ledd his sheepe To pasture in the lease, And ther to feed while he, the while, Might dream of his disease. And all alone (if he remayne

Alone, that is in loue,) Unto himselfe alone, he mourn'd The passions he did proue. Oh heauens! (qouth he,) ar these th'effects Of faithfull loue's desarts? Will Cynthea now forsake my loue? Haue women faithless hearts ? And will not witts, nor woords, nor woorks,

I,

Nor long-endur'd laments, Bring to my playnts, pitie or peace; Or to my teares, contents? that enchayn'd my loue desires, From changinge thoughts as free, euer were true thoughts to her, Or her thoughts falce to me. that for her my wanderinge sheepe

As

I,

Forkoose, forgott, forwent; Nor of my selfe, nor them tooke keepe,

But in her loue's content. Shall I, like meads with winter's rayne Be turned into teares,

Shall I, of whose true feelinge payne,

These greenes the record beares :
Causeles be scorn'd, disdayn'd, despis'd?
Then witnes this desire;
Loue was in woman's weed disguisde,
And not in men's attire.
And thus he said, and downe he lies,

Syinge as life would part.
Oh, Cynthia, thou hast angel's eyes,
But yet a woman's heart!

QD. MR. DIER.
[From the Oxford Herald.]

INDEX TO PLATES IN VOL. LXXXH. PART 1.

Alberbury Church, Salop, 9.

Kalendar of Esel, 609.

Antiquaries, Society of, proposed Arms Lee, Kent, Monument at, 529.

for, 529.

Autographs, 529.

Birmingham, Statue at, to Nelson, 417. Brasses in St. Michael's Church, St. Alban's, 321.

Chester le Street Church, 513.
Clive Chapel, Salop, 609.
Cooking Apparatus, 33.

Flamsted Church, Herts, 210.
Hadnall Chapel, Salop, 609.
Halnaker House, Sussex, 409.
Iving hoe Church, Bucks, 209.

Monument at Lee, Kent, 529.

Nelson, Statue of, at Birmingham, 417Rievaulx Abbey, 103.

Ring, antient, 321, 529.

St. Alban's, Brasses in St. Michael's at, 321
Seals, antient, 321.

Slater's Cooking Apparatus, 33.
Stoney Stanton Church, co. Leic. 17.
Upas Tree, 113.

Winchester College, Figure at, 114.

Witherley Church, co. Leic. 241..
Wrentham Hall, Suffolk, 313.

PREFACE

TO THE

FIRST PART OF THE EIGHTY-SECOND VOLUME.

Quò magis in dubiis hominem spectare perîclis
Convenit, adversisque in rebus noscere qui sit,
Nam veræ voces tum demum pectore ab imo
Ejiciuntur, et eripitur Persona, manet Res.

IT is a remark of the Elder PLINY that one of the prin cipal objects of Nature in the creation of the Cock, was to warn men against the indulgence of indolence, and to rouse them to activity and labour. "Gallos excitandis in opera mortalibus, rumpendoque somno esse à Naturâ genitos, cum şole cubitum euntes, quintâque castrensi vigiliâ ad curam laboremque revocantes, nec solis ortum incautis paventes obrepere."

We also have these periodic warnings, when we are roused to self-examination, and are induced to place our selves before our Readers, Friends, and Correspondents, with the anxious desire to know whether, for the preceding Six Months, we have discharged our duty to our own credit and their satisfaction. We flatter ourselves that we have: And having, in this interval, brought to their final, and it may be presumed successful, accomplishment, two great and important incidental labours, "The History of Leicestershire," and the "Literary Anecdotes of the Eighteenth Century," we experience no diminution of zeal or elasticity; and look before us with the hope that this, our almost only present Literary Labour, will proceed with its accustomed vigour. We are further warned by the solemn language of the philosophic LUCRETIUS, which we have adopted for our motto, to use no other language but that of Truth and Soberness; and this compels us ingenuously. to acknowledge that the aspect of things about us, is far from being brighter than when we last appeared before

our

our Readers in an Address like the present. We then spoke, with the energy of Men and freedom of Britons, of our unalterable attachment to the Religious Establishment of our Country. If it were then in apprehended peril, it is not less so at the present period, when our honest zeal is termed Bigotry; our hesitation in admitting those to power, who never yet enjoyed without abusing it, is denominated Illiberality. But we pause, not without adhering with due solemnity to our former protestations, not without invoking our Countrymen to be firm in their principles, unshaken by the general fever of the times, and undaunted by clamour or by menace.

Let us turn, not unreluctantly, to a subject about which all parties, all sects, all mankind, are agreed.Ask of the meanest person that you meet the value of Learning? he will say it is of the greatest. Inquire of those whom you may encounter at the Court, in the City, in the Streets, or in the Markets, whether they are acquainted with Learning? If they say they are, ask them again whether they are desirous to improve their knowledge:-One and all will eagerly and anxiously express their wish to do so.-Here then we rest, and make our honourable stand.-Here we provoke no enmities, irritate no parties, offend no sects, inflame no passions.-As we are to all acceptable, so on our part, as long as the cause of Religion and good Morals is preserved inviolate, we receive without prejudice, and countenance without distinction, whatever has a tendency to promote Knowledge and the Sciences in all their various ramifications.

To this unreserved and candid declaration, we may be permitted to subjoin the patriotic wish, that the present inauspicious fermentations, of every description, may be speedily and effectually allayed. Nor will it be unbecoming the Spirit of Loyalty, by which we trust we have been invariably distinguished, still further to add the hope, that the new direction and path which the Dæmon of War is now about to take, may lead to the confusion, humiliation, and defeat, of that Individual, who, by the mysterious dispensations of Providence, has, for so long a period, been permitted to erect his conquering Throne upon the misery and anguish of the Nations of the Earth.

July 15, 1812

THE

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Met. Diaries for Dec. 1811, and Jan. 1812 2,8 Slater's Patent Cooking Apparatus described 33
G. Puttenham, Author of Art of Poesie"...3 Dr. Lettsom's. LXXIIId Letter on Prisons...34
Remark by Killigrew on Kirk's Conduct....ib. Mr. Neild's Remarks on the Poultry Compter 35
Letter of Bp. Atterbury-Westby Family...
Maty's Letter to the Vice-chancellor 1768. 5
ARCHITECTURAL INNOVATION, NO. CLVIII....ib.
Dr. Milner-Winchester Cathedral......
Old Church of Alberbury in Shropshire. ...9
Series of Letters on Acoustics, Letter I...... ib. Mr. Wilmot's Life of Bishop Hough...... .41
Capt. Laborne-Titles of Kings of England 12 Bp. Hurd's Edition of Addison's Works.. ..49
Royal Palace at Eltham in Kent described. 13 Dibdin's Bibliomania, continued.............52
Lanterns in Churches-Bibliomania....... 14 Battles of Talavera-Danube, and Barrosa 56
Vincent Corbet, the Father of Bp. Corbet...15 Battle of Albuera-Young's Sermon, &c....58
Fashionable Meaning of precisely and small 16 SELECT POETRY for January 1812.......60-64
Stoney Stauton, Leic.-Hints to Writers, &c. 17 Debates in present Session of Parliament ...65
English Bible-Deuteronomy, chap. xxxii. 20 Interesting Intell. from the London Gazettes 69
Locking of Carriages-Mouuments destroyed21 Naval Intelligence-Shipwrecks, &c..........74
The Familes of Mendes and Da Costa...... 22 Abstract of the principal Foreign Occurrences 76
Antient Branch of Revenue in Scotland......24 News from various Parts of the Country
The Bagpipe?-Scarcity of Bread obviated 25 Domestic Intelligence......
Dr. Bell's System long known in India 29 Mr. Mainwaring's Address to Grand Jury...85
Vindication of the Princes of Orange.........ib. Preferments-Births and Marriages .........
Successful Intrepidity of a British Sailor 27 Biographical Account of Lord Newton...... 38
Fellowsof Colleges defended-Curious Picture30 Obituary, with Anecd. of remarkable Persons 89
Will of a Husbandman 1519-Dr. Sherwen 31 Prices of the Markets-Bill of Mortality
Controversy respecting Henry VII's Chapel 32 Prices of Stocks for the Month of January. 96
Embellished with Perspective Views of the Churches of ALBERBURY, in SHROPSHIRE,
and STONEY STANTON, in Leicestershire;

Notes respecting Mr. Gray and Dr. Bentley 37
West Indies-Proverb?-Richard Dixon? 38
Etymology of Whirlpool, Walpole, &c......39

..7 Literary Intelligence Index Indicatorius...40

REVIEW OF NEW PUBLICATIONS; viz.

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METEOROLOGICAL TABLE for Jan. 1812. By W. CARY, Strand.

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