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above mentioned, is to draw from it some strong arguments in favour of the truth and excellence of our holy Religion; arguments constituting an important internal evidence in its behalf, and therefore suited to come more directly home to men's business and bosoms, than any external proofs of its authenticity, which, being addressed to their understandings, may, and it is to be feared too often do, play round the head, without coming near the heart.

Let us then observe, with a little attention, the feelings to which, by woeful experience, we find the whole human race to be more or less exposed, and from which if we have escaped, 'tis often greatly owing to the happy situation or circumstances in which a kind Providence has placed us; and how fully shall we be led to own the peculiar suitableness of the precepts contained in the Bible, to the condition of man. Let us mark the frequent and fatal domination of

written, Vengeance repay, saith the Lo man who paid prope admonition, "Be not; let not the Su your wrath, neither Devil" or, lastly, who claimed forgive but in proportion as exercise it towards i thren of mankind—b temptation whatsoev inhuman a deed as fellow-creature? Ho to appreciate that d which, from its ben bears such intrinsic indeed worthy of a D and how diligent sho cultivation of the whose blessed tender mote "Glory to Go and on earth, peace, men!"

Mr. URBAN, An
YOU will much o

passions over the more exalted and serting the follo

legitimate powers of reason and conscience; and we cannot fail to confess the utility, and I might venture to add the necessity for that system, which has the most direct tendency to bridle and restrain every dangerous excess of criminal and lawless desire, and, especially, to root up and exterminate the latent seeds of malice and revenge, before they have time to expand and be called into action. To say nothing of those other various evil inclinations, against which our blessed Lord expressly warns us to be on our guard; let us for the present purpose only dwell on those particu lar charges contained in the Scripture, which expressly apply to the case under our consideration. Could any man who duly reflected on the import of the command to love our enemies, and to pray for them that despitefully use us and persecute us; and who, at the same time, paid a just respect to the bright and consistent example set us by the Divine Author and Finisher of our faith, on all occasions, but more especially at the dread hour when his malicious enemies were employed in the execution of their most cruel designs against him? Could any man who rightly reverenced the injunction, "Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather give place unto wrath, for it is

on a tablet in the o chester Chapel, put u of the late Mr. Walte death is noticed, and very justly recorded, zine for October last mentioned as the wif min Jeffreys, was a n Judge Blackstone, an plished and amiable husband was inconsola and survived her only Yours, &c.

"M.S. A dilectorum in defletorum in reverendi Benjamini hujusce Colleg

et

Jane uxo

quorum ille obii

die 7mo Jul. ann. æ. 53 hæc die 12mo Mart, ann. æ In utrosq hoc marmore testatur suum a Gualterus frater s

Mr. URBAN, Rolver THE institution of

Lecture having

been discussed in your Miscellany; I rely up

4

1812.] Mr. Durham's Establishment of the Rolvenden Lecture. 509

tomed candour for the insertion of the inclosed Remarks by the Institutor thereof, J. G. DURHAM.

It may not be improper to exhibit the plan of the Rolveuden Lecture, as some have ventured to condemn what they did not correctly know. Πολλοις αντιλέγειν μεν εθος περι παυλος

ομοίως,

Ορθώς δ' αντιλέγειν, εκει τοτ' εν εθεώ.

Once every month, when the moon was at its full, on a Thursday evening, at past 6 o'clock, after that the Prayers had been read and the Psalms sung, I used to explain from the desk one of the Lessons of the day, or else some other portion of holy writ. Where was the impropriety of this? Where the slightest "departure from ecclesiastical order?" What Court, or what Canon, is there which interdicts it? The Lecture was delivered in a village, but it is a populous one, containing near 1200 souls: it was an Evening Lecture, but it was given at those seasons only when it was physically impossible that "deeds of darkness" could be committed, As to those Clergymen who "omit in the performance of the public Service, the Litany, or the Communion," I surely am not responsible for them; I defy any one to level that charge against myself; and

as

"to carelessness and disgusting haste" in the reading of the Prayers, the commendations of my severest adversaries, for a very contrary conduct, entirely preclude the necessity of my making any reply to that insinuation.

As your Correspondent subscribes himself "A Christian of the OLD School," it is reasonable to presume, that he cannot be ignorant of the antient method of ecclesiastical instruction-he cannot be ignoraut that the very method which he so rigidly censures is that which Ezra, which the Apostles, which Christ § himself adopted nor did it terminate with them the Church hath employed it at every period since her first formation. The effects which, in the pre

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Wednesday, being a Church-day,

would have been chosen rather than Thursday, had it not been that our or ganist was then engaged. + Nehemiah viii, 5—8.

sent instance, attended the means used, are sufficient to recommend it to the attention of every liberal mind. Multitudes crowded to hear the Scriptures explained, they became more addicted to the reading of them at home; the morals of the parish were improved, and Sunday-selling and other enormities more easily suppressed. "Solemnity and decorum" peculiarly characterised the assembled worshipers; nor, "from the more gloomy parts of the Church," did any of " those unseemly noises" proceed, which have so unaccountably affected the imagination, aud disturbed the peace, of my unknown antagonist. Instead of his exclaiming, "Behold what a weariness is it!" the word of truth explained, and the path to Heaven opened, were the joy and rejoicing of the honest rustick's heart. Instead of his being fatigued by the services of God's house, so refreshing were "the waters that issued out from under the threshold thereof," that impatiently did he long for, and gladly did he hail, the return of the sweetly solemn hour which recalled him from the cares of time to the contemplation of eternity, from the labours of the band to the repose of the soul, from the thorns and thistles of earth to the fruits and flowrets of Paradise.

Let the effects then, I repeat it, justify those means which the word of God sauctions, and which the institutes of man do not condemn.

On the subject of extemporary exhortation, allow me to add a few observations. The "Christian of the Old School" ought to have recollected that the use of written discourses in the pulpit is an innovation, and that it is, in the fullest sense of the word, an insulated practice. The Orator in the Senate, the Pleader at the Bar, the Lecturer in the Schools, all reject it; the Pulpit is its only refuge, and that but recentioris ævi. But let me be rightly understood; I trust that I am no Bigot. It is the matter, not the manner, which is most to be regarded. Truth is truth, whether read from a book, or extemporaneously announced; and truth, in any form, must ever be acceptable and amiable in the eye of an impar tial man. I have long been of opinion, that what St. Paul said of meats

diad to Sermone

him that readeth not; and let not him that readeth' not, judge him that readeth: for God hath received him."

Στι

μεν ταυτα δοκεν 156, εμοι δε ταδε. Perhaps, the preaching by notes is the least objectionable mode-Wilkins recommended it, and Burnet used it. It comprehends in itself, more than any other scheme which can be devised, the accuracy of the written, and the energy of the extemporaneous. Were it but cultivated in our preparatory course of education, with a fourth of the assiduity with which many inferior objects are pursued, it would not be so rare an attainment as some may apprehend. In proof that there has been no exaggeration of statement, or colouring of facts, I would refer, in attestation of what has been advanced, to the evidence of that loving and beloved people among whom I now reside, and among whom I have not heard of a single irregularity having occurred, in consequence

of the Lecture having been instituted. Instead of feeling any regret on account of the course which I have followed here, I should be happy to see it more generally pursued; and heartily do I pray for the fulfilment of that glorious prophecy, announced by the evangelical Prophet, as characterising the winding-up of the last dispensation: "It shall come to pass that from one new-moon to another, and from one Sabbath to another, shall ALL flesh come to worship before me, saith the Lord."

Mr, URBAN, Greville-street, June 2. HE following statement of the TH very frequent occurrence of Hernia, at different periods of life, has been obtained principally from patients relieved by the City of London Truss Society, within the short period of four years and a half, and entirely under my own observation. It appeared to me to form an interesting article of reference to the medical, philosophical, and general reader: as such I have taken the liberty of transmitting it for publication in your valuable Journal, if it meets your approbation.

In 3176 patients 2702 were males, and 474 were females, 202 patients under 10 years of 160 ditto, between 10 and 20 ditto. age.

310 ditto,

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20 and 30 ditto.

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JOHN T

Surgeon to the Truss Society, th bury Dispensarie on Anatomy and Mr. URBAN, King

WHEN that elega Beauties of Eng and Britton were the e its appearance, and plied to for informatio sidence on the confines in the neighbourhood shire and Suffolk: an communications I for ing of Swaffham Tw Cambridgeshire, so c circumstance of two placed in one enclosur of which was acknow Brayley, both personal blue cover of the 7th I Messrs. Brayley and work in question. Sin both (I believe) withd direction of this publica it has fallen into bette the publick to determin curacy in No. X. vol. X some reason to compla received a few days sind engraving, by Scott, is g drawing; but it is at Churches, Norfolk. As Mr.Thomson, and it is ca well known to many lit both of yours and mine, my assertion. I have no difficulty in proving plain that the engraver justice to my sketch, for of which I can vouch, h cient it may be in exe

1812.] Swaffham Churches.-Leamington Spa, near Warwick. 511

spire of the further Church was remarkably light, but there was a projection towards the base, which I had noticed in my sketch; because, from this trifling defect, it was thought fit to pull down the spire: although two spirited gentlemen, then resident in the parish, offered their assistance, liberally, towards repairing the building as it then stood. Sir Charles Watson, bart. and Johu Allix, esq. since deceased, with several of the parishioners, were anxious to preserve an edifice that was a beautiful object for a great many miles round. From the delay of near eleven years, since I made this sketch for the Beauties of England to its appearing in the work, I was induced to imagine the editor had determined that it should not appear in their work, or had lost the sketch. I had it therefore in contemplation to offer it to your valuable Repository, as it is curious both from its architecture and situation and several other circumstances, as well as that now it has entirely lost its character, the spire being demolished, in doing which a beautiful specimen of church architecture, the porch, was destroyed by the workmen battering down the spire upon it. The other church has been modernized in a style that has been very well called Carpenter's Gothic.-Happy would it have been if your animated Correspondent, "An Architect," had previously seen it, and by his timely and spirited remonstrances prevented this barbarous demolition.

If, however, you think, after its appearance in the work above mentioned, it might be acceptable to your Readers; having the original sketch, I will send it to you, with some further remarks upon it *.

Mr. URBAN,

C. W.

Leamington Spa,
June 5.

NOW address you from one of the most rapidly improving and fascinating Villages in the kingdom, particulars of which will meet the public eye in due time; as Mr. PRATT has been with us some time, and promises us to be ready with A GUIDE, which is to make its appearance early in the next season. A prospectus informs us, it is to combine the agree able and useful, both which the active, as well as the retired scenes of this delightful place and its environs

We shall be happy to receive it. EDIT.

will abundantly supply; of which circumstance, the publick are sufficiently aware, the Author of the Gleanings will avail himself; particularly, as we presume he intends affixing his name, since it is given in the prospectus. That it merits his best attentions, no persons (who have visited a spot which has afforded the best evidence of its superior claims of air and water, and their salutary influence) will deny ; uniting the most beautiful walks, rides, drives, and every other accommodation, amidst the luxury of some of the finest roads in England; conducting to many of the most magnificent mansions, prospects, and ruins in the empire. With all these agremens there has certainly been hitherto a dearth of interior attraction, till Mr. Bisset (the proprietor of the Museum in Birmingham, and well known as the author of many pleasant, useful, and moral publications) has, in a most spirited and adventurous manner, led the way to some higher orders of amusement and curiosity, for the gratification of the publick; by opening an elegant picture gallery, news room, and promenade, where the London and Provincial papers are regularly taken in, also the most eminent periodical publications and other works of taste, so as to render it at once a place of intellectual and rational amusements. Mr. B. has certainly displayed great taste in the elegance of its decorations; and there can be no doubt but that the undertaking will succeed, as the subscribers are numerous and of the first rank, and it is already become a most agreeable and fashionable place of resort, being a desideratum long wanted to complete the attractions of the Spa. It is to be hoped that his example will be followed by other liberal and ingenious men, as the place advances in reputation: but, in the mean time, he will have the merit of having introduced and established one of the most scientific and interesting sources of entertainment and information. The rapidity of the new buildings is as if produced by magic; among the prime of them must be reckoned the superb assembly-room, and the new baths. Your known love of public good, and the labour or ingenuity that produces it, will recommend the objects above described to your liberal attention. MIGRATOR.

Yours, &c.

A METE

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May 22. Cloudy morning, fair afternoon, with Scud Cumulus
23. Various clouds in different heights. 24. Clouded sky
a wavy, and in some places mottled, appearance of the c
Small rain; fair evening. 26. Fine warm morning, Cir
flying haze of a brownish colour here and there appeared in th
Fine warm day and various clouds. 28. Clouds in two str
sunset. 29. All the modifications appeared, and were fo
30. Some Cirri early, afternoon all the clouds were compact
31. Clouds in two strata, cloudy and rather windy by night.
June 1. Small rain A. M. sun and clouds P. M. 2. Clear
clouds. 3. Some small rain followed by fair afternoon, wit
4. Fair, Cumuli, &c. 5. Cumuli in the day, which was
6. Cumuli in the day, fine clear evening with Cirri. 7
clear dry day. 8. Chiefly cloudy and cool. 9. Cloudy
with Cumuli and some Cirri, evening Nimbi, no rain fell here
over from N. W. 10. Sun and clouds, cloudy evening
Cumuli, Cirrostratus in evening. By sunset the clouds w
with a crimson tint. 12. Cloudy morning, evening Cirros
very early, with Cirrocumulus, &c. a mist came on soon aft
by clouds, fine evening. 14. Cirrus, Cirrocumulus, and C
day, with some Cirrostratus, &c.
16. Hard showers before light
17. Rainy feature of the Cirrus
cloudy day, rainy evening.
Barometer rose in the night.
P. S. I have observed that rain, accompained by a rising Bar
healthy, and is followed by increased temperature. Can the
attributed to its being electrified positively, as I have once or
believe it to be?

Clapton, June 22, 1812.

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15. Fair with various cl plumose Cirri, Cumulostra &c. followed by showers. 19. Wind and rain. 21. Showery like yesterday.

20.

THOM

*In rainy weather the Cirrus is seldom so fibrous, nor the which it may change so well defined, as when the air is dry.

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