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Statistics of the Machinery of the l. S. S'eamship Powhutan.

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Planing and turning,

934

934 sq. in.

Total cost,

13,984.00

Carried up,

1,056,081

720,777

54,100 336,156.04

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For the Journal of the Franklin Institute.

Caloric Ship Ericsson. Not having had the privilege, alone enjoyed by reporters of newspapers and Professor James J. Mapes, in an exhibition of the capacities and performances of this vessel, and entertaining a professional feeling regarding them of the deepest character, I ask the favor of a space in the Journal for a few brief questions, which, if correctly answered, are calculated to afford conclusive elements for an opinion of the actual physical results attained by this novel arrangement of a caloric engine, and of its probable utility.

1st. If the fuel expended by the Ericsson per hour had been added to that expended per hour by many of the larger class of side wheel steam tugs, would they not have towed her (her immersed buckets and water wheel arms removed) at the highest speed she attained in either of her trials? If not, why not? And if so, wherein is the economy of this caloric engine in fuel?

2d. What is the space occupied by the engines of this vessel, including coal stowage for the average period of five days, and what her speed in knots (sea miles) per hour?

3d. When the space occupied by engines of sufficient power to drive this vessel at a speed of 15 knots per hour, and the coal stowage required for five days, are fully provided for, how much less would it be than that which would be required by a steam engine and boilers capable of effecting the speed of fifteen knots, and with fuel for an equal period?

4th. This vessel being so far completed as to have made two trial trips, and her equipment being such as to enable persons to live on board of her, when is it that she will proceed on her first voyage?

STRAIGHT Edge,

For the Journal of the Franklin Institute.

The Cunard Steamer Arabia. This steamship, of which the particulars are published in the present number of this Journal, (vide page 122,) has recently arrived at New York, (Jan. 16th,) on her first trip, in 14 days and 11 hours running time from Liverpool, having passed 20 hours at Halifax, coaling. Total time from Liverpool, 15 days 7 hours.

She has been intended by her owners, from the time of laying her keel, to beat the Collins steamers, and no endeavor or expense has been spared to accomplish the purpose. It will be seen by the article referred to, that her length compared to her beam is very great, and that while her register tonnage does not exceed that of the Collins vessels, and her actual capacity is much less, her cylinder capacity is considerably greater, being the largest engine power placed on board any steamer in the world. How the intention, above referred to, has been fulfilled, will be seen when we state that the Baltic, which left two or three days before her, (Dec. 29th,) arrived on the 11th inst., in 13 days 3 hours, real time from Liverpool. Difference in favor of the Baltic, 1 day 71 hours running time.

The weather encountered by these two vessels was of course not materially different. If any difference existed it was certainly in the Arabia's favor, for before the A.'s departure, the Baltic encountered a gale in the channel, which added about 20 hours to her time.

This is the consequence of overpowering a vessel whose model is not adapted to a high rate of speed. While our transatlantic friends were

a “imitating Brother Jonathan by sharpening the bows,” they had better have carried the imitation a little farther, by giving their vessel breadth

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enough to secure stability and the proper strength. As it is, the ship, from all accounts, is very unsteady, and was strained by attempting to push her through at a high speed, while her consumption of fuel was enormous. She was certainly not sent away from Liverpool on an avowed race with the Baltic, without a reasonable supply of coal to carry her to New York; indeed, we are informed by the Liverpool papers that she had 1200 tons on board at her departure. Yet, on arriving off Halifax, she was obliged to put in for more.

When the end held in view in the construction of these ships is remembered, the La Plata, (formerly Arabia,) and the Arabia, (formerly Persia,) must be considered failures. The first has been running for some months past on the West India mail line; and neither of them, so far, has made speed which can at all compare with that of the Collins steamers.

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For the Journal of the Franklin Institute. Particulars of the Steamers Building or just Finished in the United States.

We give below particulars of the following steamers now building or just finished in the United States. The list is not as extensive as could be wished, and we trust that manufacturers will forward such information of the engines they are building as is given below, or any other deemed suitable for the Journal.

New York.-Steamer John L. Stevens, just finished for William H. Aspinwall, Esq., for the California trade. Hull by Smith & Dimon. Machinery by Stillman, Allen & Co. HULL.Length on deck,

285 feet. Breadth of beam,

40 Depth of hold,

26 Tonnage, (Custom House)

2202 tons. Enging.–Single Oscillating. Diameter of cylinder,

85 inches. Length of stroke,

9 feet. Boilers.-Two "drop flue.” Length,

23 feet. Breadth,

14 ft. 6 diam. Depth,

14 «6 Number of furnaces,

6 Length

7 feet. Breadth

4 feet each. Grate surface,

168 sq. feet. Total heating surface,

6066 Number of flues,

108 Diameter

13 inches. Capacity of steam drums,

360 cubic feet. Number of chimneys,

2 Diameter of chimneys,

5 feet. Height,

36 feet.
PADDLE WHEELS.-Ordinary Radial.
Diameter over boards,

32 feet.
Length of
Depth of

20 inches. Number of

32

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