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good thing, then we will need to revise a good many of our valuations. War, for instance!

As the old familiar lines put it:

"Now, Dives daily feasted and was gorgeously arrayed,

Not at all because he liked it, but because 'twas good for trade;
That the people might have calico, he clothed himself in silk,
And surfeited himself with cream that they might have more milk.
And e'en to show his sympathy with the deserving poor,

He did no useful work himself that they might do the more."

May I be allowed one word more?

I was reading the other day the report of a memorable dinner in London more than fifty years ago. The dinner was given by Christopher Neville to some of the leaders of English thought-leaders in politics, literature, science, art and religion. After the dinner there was a series of what we Americans call "after-dinner speeches." Dean Stanley was asked to preside. There were no set addresses; no topic assigned. Everything was extempore. The Dean arose and proposed for discussion the question, "Who will dominate the future?" He called upon Professor Huxley to speak first. The professor got up, and after a little skirmishing he gave it as his opinion that the future will be dominated by the nation that sticks most closely to the facts. The report goes on to say that he left his audience profoundly impressed. After a moment of silence, the Dean again arose and called upon Edward Miall. Edward Miall, by the way, was an English journalist who was also a Member of Parliament and president of the Royal Commission on Education. Beginning quietly, he went on to say: "Gentlemen, I have been listening to the last speaker with profound interest, and I agree with him. I believe the future will belong to the nation that sticks to the facts, but I want to add one word-'all the facts. Not some of them; all of them. Now, the greatest

fact of history," he went on, "is God."

The guests at that dinner have all vanished, but the question they discussed is with us still; yes, with us in an

aggravated, frightful form. These are dark days, but they are not any darker than many another day the world has seen. I used to love to look out upon the mountains in my California home when the air was clear. And when the fog fell down and hid them, I never doubted they were there. I knew they were there because for years I had feasted on them. Shall we doubt God because for a season He has hidden His face? Have we not seen Him?

"God of our fathers, known of old,

Lord of our far-flung battle line,
Beneath whose awful hand we hold
Dominion over palm and pine;
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Lest we forget; lest we forget."

ONE HUNDRED AND NINTH

ANNUAL FESTIVAL

OF THE

NEW ENGLAND SOCIETY

IN THE

CITY OF NEW YORK.

The New England Society in the City of New York commemorated the One Hundred and Ninth Anniversary of its organization and the Two Hundred and Ninety-fourth Anniversary of the Landing of the Pilgrims on Plymouth Rock by the usual festival at the Waldorf-Astoria, Fifth Avenue, Thirty-third and Thirty-fourth Streets, Tuesday evening, December twenty-second, Nineteen hundred and fourteen.

A large representation of the members of the Society and their guests were present.

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New England Guinea Hen roasted in casserole

Celery and Apple Salad, Mayonnaise

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Mr. A. Barton Hepburn, President of the Society,

presided.

The toasts were as follows:

TOASTS

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

THE MEMORY OF OUR DEAD

FOREFATHERS' DAY.-PRESIDENT EMERITUS CHARLES W. ELIOT. THE DAY OF THE PILGRIMS' SONS. THE Reverend LYMAN Аввотт.

SOME KNOTS AND A FEW NUBBLES.-MR. HOLMAN DAY. THE UNITED STATES AS A WORLD POWER.-THE HONORABLE JAMES M. BECK.

The guests of the Society were as follows:

President Emeritus CHARLES W. ELIOT.

Dr. LYMAN ABBOTT.

The Honorable JAMES M. BECK.

Mr. HOLMAN DAY.

Rear Admiral NATHANIEL R. USHER, U.S.N.

General THOMAS H. HUBBARD, President of the New England Society,

1904-1905.

Mr. AUSTIN B. FLETCHER, President of the New England Society, 1906-1907.

The Honorable SETH LOW, President of the New England Society,

1909-1910.

Mr. HOWLAND DAVIS, President of the New England Society, 19111912.

The Honorable AUGUSTUS VAN WYCK, President of the New England Society of Brooklyn.

Mr. GEORGE AUSTIN MORRISON, JR., President of the Saint Andrew's Society.

The Honorable VERNON M. DAVIS, President of the Saint Nicholas Society.

Mr. VICTOR HERBERT, President of the Society of the Friendly Sons of Saint Patrick.

Mr. CHARLES W. BOWRING, President of the Saint George's Society. Rev. JOHN WILLIAMS, President of the Saint David's Society.

Mr. S. READING BERTRON, Vice-President of the New York Southern Society.

Commander BENJAMIN F. HUTCHISON, U.S.N.

The divine blessing was asked by the Reverend John Williams, President of the St. David's Society.

At the conclusion of the dinner, the President called the assembly to order and spoke as follows:

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