The English Grammar Schools to 1660: Their Curriculum and Practice

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University Press, 1908 - 548 pages

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Page 220 - With antique pillars massy proof, And storied windows richly dight, Casting a dim religious light. There let the pealing organ blow To the full-voiced quire below In service high and anthems clear As may with sweetness, through mine ear, Dissolve me into ecstasies, And bring all Heaven before mine eyes.
Page 100 - Hath been derived down to us, and received In a succession for the noblest way Of breeding up our youth, in letters, arms, Fair mien, discourses, civil exercise, And all the blazon of a gentleman ? Where can he learn to vault, to ride, to fence, To move his body gracefuller, to speak His language purer, or to tune his mind Or manners more to the harmony of nature, Than in these nurseries of nobility?
Page 61 - Locrian remnants ; but still to be reduced in their nightward studies wherewith they close the day's work under the determinate sentence of David or Solomon, or the evangels and apostolic scriptures.
Page 71 - And the good old man, though he was very learned, yet knowing that God leads us not to heaven by many nor by hard questions, like an honest Angler, made that good, plain, unperplexed Catechism which is printed with our good old Service-Book.
Page 184 - For if the trumpet give an uncertain sound, who shall prepare himself to the battle...
Page 10 - Not a man in Europe now, who talks bravely against the Church, but owes it to the Church, that he can talk at all...
Page 90 - And now, lastly, will be the time to read with them those organic arts which enable men to discourse and write perspicuously, elegantly, and according to the fitted style of lofty, mean, or lowly.
Page 260 - And whereas heretofore there hath been great diversity in saying and singing in Churches within this realm ; some following Salisbury use, some Hereford use, and some the use of Bangor, some of York, some of Lincoln ; now from henceforth all the whole realm shall have but one use.
Page 218 - The interim of unsweating themselves regularly and convenient rest before meat may both with profit and delight be taken up in recreating and composing their travailed...
Page 100 - Call you that desperate, which by a line Of institution, from our ancestors Hath been derived down to us, and received In a succession, for the noblest way Of breeding up our youth, in letters, arms, Fair mien, discourses, civil exercise, And all the blazon of a gentleman...

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