Collections Historical & Archaeological Relating to Montgomeryshire and Its Borders, Volume 31

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The Club, 1900
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Page 128 - Here Ouse, slow winding through a level plain Of spacious meads, with cattle sprinkled o'er, Conducts the eye along his sinuous course Delighted. There, fast rooted in their bank, Stand, never overlook'd, our favourite elms, That screen the herdsman's solitary hut; While far beyond, and overthwart the stream, That, as with molten glass, inlays the vale, 170 The sloping land recedes into the clouds ; Displaying on its varied side the grace Of hedgerow beauties numberless, square tower.
Page 202 - SMALL service is true service while it lasts : Of humblest Friends, bright Creature ! scorn not one ; The Daisy, by the shadow that it casts, Protects the lingering dew-drop from the Sun.
Page 339 - Parret, and as well west as east of Selwood, and also north of the Thames and west of the Severn, and also some part of the North-Welsh people.
Page 339 - Buttington on the bank of the Severn, and there beset them about, on either side, in a fastness. When they had now sat there many weeks on both sides of the river, and the King was in the west in Devon, against the fleet, then were the enemy distressed for want of food, and having eaten a great part of their horses, the others being starved with hunger, then went they out against the men who were encamped on the east bank of the river and fought against them, and the Christians had the victory.
Page 48 - Behold, Thou hast made my days as it were a span long, and mine age is even as nothing in respect of Thee ; and verily every man living is altogether vanity. For man walketh in a vain shadow, and disquieteth himself in vain ; he heapeth up riches, and cannot tell who shall gather them. And now, Lord, what is my hope : truly my hope is even in Thee.
Page 22 - Ocean, the first thing which strikes us is, that, the north-east and south-east monsoons, which are found the one on the north and the other on...
Page 73 - Twentith yeare of the raigne of or Soveraigne Lord James by the grace of God King of England ffraunce and Jreland defendor of the faith &c.
Page 159 - Sir—I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of yesterday's date, and in reply...
Page 226 - ... of the crown; but I am mortified to find that your Majesty thinks me capable of giving a judgment which none but an ignorant or a dishonest man could give." "I am determined," said the king, "to have twelve judges who will be all of my mind as to this matter.
Page 202 - Furthermore the LORD was angry with me for your sakes, and sware that I should not go over Jordan, and that I should not go in unto that good land, which the LORD thy God giveth thee for an inheritance: 22 But I must die in this land, I must not go over Jordan: but ye shall go over, and possess that good land.

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