Page images
PDF
EPUB

another person set out on the road with a lantern, and went quite to Cambridge, where they only learnt that she left the inn at six that evening. They explored the road afresh that night, and for four succeeding days, and searched the huts of the gypsies, whom they suspected might have robbed and murdered her, in vain, till she was unexpectedly discovered in the manner already mentioned. Mr. Okes, a surgeon, first saw her in the cart, as she was removing home. She spoke to him with a voice tolerably strong, but rather hoarse her hands and arms were sodden, but not very cold, though her legs and feet were, and the latter, in a great measure, mortified. She was immediately put to bed, and weak broth given her occasionally. From the time of her being lost she had eaten only snow, and believed she had not slept till Friday the 8th; her only evacuation was a little water. The hurry of spirits, occasioned by too many visitors, rendered her feverish; and her feet were found to be completely mortified, from being frost-bitten before she was covered with snow. She was so disturbed with company that Mr. O. had little hopes of her recovery. He ordered a clyster of mutton broth, which greatly relieved' her, some saline mixture, with antimonial wine, and strong decoction of bark, and three grains of opium in the course of a day. He opened the vesications on her feet, and continued the use of brandy as at first; clysters, opium, and bark, being continued, with Port wine. The cold had extended its violent effects from the end of the toes to the middle of the instep, including more than an inch above the heels, and all the bottom of the feet, which were mortified, and were poulticed with stale beer and oatmeal boiled together. Inward cold, as she called it, affected her, and she desired the cataplasms might be renewed as often as possible, and very warm. The 19th and 20th she was seized with violent diarrhoea, which occasioned great weakness; and, two days after, several toes were so loose as to be removed by the scissars. The 23d she was taken up without fainting. All the toes were removed, and the integuments from the bottom of one foot, except a piece at the heel, which was so long ere it loosened itself that the os calcis and tendo Achillis had suffered. The sloughs on the other foot were thrown off more slowly, and two of the toes removed. All but one great toe was removed by the seventeenth; and, on removing the sloughs from the heels, the bone was bare in many places: and, wherever the mortification had taken place, was one large sore, very tender. The sores were much diminished, and the great toe taken

off, by the end of March, and an unusual sleepiness came on. By April 17th, the sores were free from slough, and daily lessened; her appetite tolerably good, and her general health began to amend; but with all these circumstances in her favour, she felt herself to be very uncomfortable; and, in fact, her prospect was most miserable; for, though her life was saved, the mutilated state in which she was left, without even a chance of being ever able to attend to the duties of her family, was almost worse than death itself; for, from the exposure of the os calcis, in all probability it would have required some months before the bottoms of her feet could be covered with new skin; and, after all, they would have been so tender as not to bear any pressure; the loss, too, of all her toes must have made it impossible for her to move herself but with the assistance of crutches. Mr. Okes ascribes the preservation of her life to her not having slept or had any evacuations under the snow, and to her resignation and the calm state of her mind. The facts before us seem strong reasons for enforcing the directions given by the Humane Society, and agreed on by all medical men, as to the treatment of persons suffering from intense cold, or long abstinence from food. The application of heat to the human body after intense cold is attended with the most dreadful consequences; it always produces extreme pain, and, most frequently, either partial or general mortification of the parts to which the heat is applied; instead, therefore, of allowing patients of this description to come near a fire, let the limbs be rubbed well with snow, or, if snow cannot be procured, let them be immersed into cold water, and afterwards chafed with flannel for a considerable length of time; and, to diminish the force of fever (which, in the case of Elizabeth Woodcock, had nearly been fatal), let the party be restrained most cautiously from taking too much or too nutritious, food*. Spirits, likewise, or wine, should, on no pretence whatever, be administered till they have first been copiously diluted with water. Great attention must be paid to the state of the bowels; and, in case of having suffered long abstinence from food, clysters of meat broth will be found to be, in every respect, of great utility. The use of opium and camphor is much to be recommended, though perhaps it may be advisable to give

*Soon after the violence of the fever had abated, there appeared all over Elizabeth Woodcock's body, arms, and face, broad reddish blotches, which Mr. Okes judged to be from the same cause which produces chilblains.

the opium, at first, in very small doses only. The Peruvian bark will certainly be found serviceable in the course of the cure in case of mortification; but I am inclined to be of opinion that it ought not to be directed till suppuration has come on."-An Account of the providential Preservation of Elizabeth Woodcock, who survived a Confinement under the Snow of nearly Eight Days and Nights in the Month of February, 1799. In Two Parts. The first by the Rev. Mr. Holme, Minister of her Parish; the second by her Surgeon, Mr. Thomas Verney Okes, was published, at Cambridge, for her benefit, and went through two editions; also, two prints from drawings of her in the Snow, by Page and Hogwood; and a third, in her bed, by J. Baldry, all of Cambridge. She closed a lingering existence July 13, 1799. We are sorry to add, that too free indulgence of spirituous liquors is supposed to have been the cause both of the accident and its fatal consequences.

1799, Aug.

V. Sir JOSHUA REYNOLDS, see p. 383.

[Instead of the List of Plates from Paintings by Sir Joshua Reynolds, in the Magazine for March 1784, we have taken the liberty of substituting the following, which is much more full and correct. It was printed a few years ago, but is now become very scarce, and has been enlarged by a friend of the Editor of these Selections. E.]

[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Original Price. £. 5. d.

Augusta, Princess.See Brunswick. Aylesford, the Rt. Hon. Louisa, Countess

Baccelli, Mademoiselle

Ditto, as Schinderlin

Bampfylde, Lady Moore, W. L. Thos. Watson,

Baddeley, Mrs. Sophia

Banks, Joseph, Esq.

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

W. Dickenson, 1774

[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Ditto, 8vo.

Barker, John, Esq. sitting in a

chair, W. L.

Barrington, Samuel, Admiral

the Hon. Mr. Eliz.

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

Rob. Mareaurd, 1788. T. Watson, 1785. Dickenson.

[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

Bath, Wm. Pulteney, Earl, 1757 Beauchamp, Isabella, Viscountess Beauclerc, Miss Elizabeth, since Lady Herbert, as Una, 4 lines, "" Nought is there under heaven's wide" &c. Ditto, a circle Beaumont, Lady Margaret Beattie, Dr, James, LL.D. Bedford, Francis, Duke, as the titular saint of England, with his brothers Lord John, Lord William Russel, and Miss Vernon, W. L.

[ocr errors]

Belgioso, Louis Borbiano, Comte Id.

[ocr errors]

Beresford, Mrs. See Lady Townshend.

Berkeley, Elizabeth, Countess
Ditto

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]
« PreviousContinue »