Missions in South India, Volume 10

Front Cover
W.H. Dalton, 1854 - 191 pages
1 Review
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
User Review - Flag as inappropriate

OCLC Number: 29435434
Related Subjects:(2)
Missions -- India.
India, South -- Description and travel.
LCCN:BV 

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 150 - These fertile plains, that softened vale, Were once the birthright of the Gael; The stranger came with iron hand, And from our fathers reft the land. Where dwell we now ? See rudely swell Crag over crag, and fell o'er fell. Ask we this savage hill we tread, For...
Page 36 - Finally, brethren, pray for us, that the word of the Lord may have free course, and be glorified, even as it is with you: 2.
Page 100 - We believe all that Paul meant, when he said, speaking of the general character of the heathen world in his time, " There is none that is righteous, no, not one; there is none that understandeth, there is none that seeketh after God ; they have all gone out of the way, there is none that doeth good, or is a doer of good, no, not one...
Page 148 - With the isolated villages of the desert it is far otherwise. They have no such meetings; they are compelled to traverse the wilds, often to a great distance from their native village. On such occasions, fathers and mothers, and all who can bear a burden, often set out for weeks at a time, and leave their children to the care of two or three infirm old people. The infant progeny, some of whom are beginning to lisp, while others can just master a whole sentence, and those still...
Page 148 - ... infirm old people. The infant progeny, some of whom are beginning to lisp, while others can just master a whole sentence, and those still further advanced, romping and playing together, the children of nature, through the livelong day, become habituated to a language of their own.
Page 166 - The worhing of a moral change among the people BY THE PROGRESS OF GENERAL INSTRUCTION AND CONSEQUENT CIVILIZATION can alone eradicate from among them the inclination to indulge in rites so horrible. But though the entire suppression of the practice of human sacrifice among this wild and barbarous race must be the work of time, yet much may be done even now, and no proper exertion should be omitted towards checking the frequency of the crime by the terror of just punishment.
Page 149 - ... advanced, romping and playing together, the children of nature, through the live-long day, become habituated to a language of their own. The more voluble condescend to the less precocious, and thus, from this infant Babel, proceeds a dialect composed of a host of mongrel words and phrases, joined together without rule, and in the course of a generation the entire character of the language is changed.
Page 130 - ... by him : all their priests, all their scholars and students, were under his ecclesiastical authority. If any were obnoxious to him, or to the priests generally, by peculiar excellence or fidelity, he could refuse ordination, or he could forbid them to preach, or by himself he could keep up the error of ordaining boys as deacons. As head of the Mission, he could check, or alter, or refuse to sanction, measures for the improvement of the people. " In the course of time, all this opposition was...
Page 67 - Ocean, the first thing which strikes us is, that, the north-east and south-east monsoons, which are found the one on the north and the other on...
Page 148 - ... tribes of Africa numbers of a nomadic character, whose origin will throw light on the history of the Bushmen. A parallel is furnished by the following facts of the case, which have hundreds of times come under my own observation, during a residence of more than twenty years among the Bechuana tribes. Connected with each of the towns among that people, there are great numbers of what are called "Balala...

Bibliographic information