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" Kent, and, with some little interruption about the period of the Conquest, and during the Protectorate, has continued in their possession till the present time. These... "
The Antiquarian and Topographical Cabinet: Containing a Series of Elegant ... - Page 4
by James Andrew Storer - 1818
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Antiquarian and Topographical Cabinet: Containing a Series of Elegant Views ...

James Storer - 1807 - 424 pages
...market-town, and derives its name from the Saxon word Brom-leag, signifying a field, or pasture of hroom ; and the great quantity of that plant on all the waste...the eighth century, hy Ethelhert, king of Kent, and, with some little interruption ahout the period of the Conquest, and during the Protectorate, has continued...
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The Beauties of England and Wales: Or, Delineations ..., Volume 8, Part 2

John Britton - 1808 - 886 pages
...market-town, derives its name from the Saxon words Brom-leag, signifying a field or pasture of broom ; and " the great quantity of that plant on all the waste places near the town, sufficiently corroborates this etymology."* The Manor of Bromley was given to the Bishops of Rochester in the eighth...
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The Beauties of England and Wales, Or, Delineations, Topographical ..., Volume 8

John Britton, Edward Wedlake Brayley, Joseph Nightingale, James Norris Brewer, John Evans, John Hodgson, Francis Charles Laird, Frederic Shoberl, John Bigland, Thomas Rees - 1808 - 878 pages
...market-town, derives its name from the Saxon words Brom-leag, signifying a field or pasture of broom ; and " the great quantity of that plant on all the waste places near the town, sufficiently corroborates this etymology."* The Manor of Bromley was given to the Bishops of Rochester in the eighth...
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Antiquarian and Topographical Cabinet,: Containing a Series of ..., Volume 8

James Storer - 1810 - 312 pages
...market-town, and derives its name from the Saxon word Brom-leag, signifying a field, or pasture of broom ; and the great quantity of that plant on all the waste places near the town, sufficiently corroborates this etymology. The manor of Bromley was given to the bishops of Rochester in the eighth...
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Ancient Reliques, Volume 1

1812 - 338 pages
...market-town, and derives its name from the Saxon word Brom-leag, signifying a field, or pasture of broom ; and the great quantity of that plant on all the waste places near the town, sufficiently corroborates this etymology. The manor of Bromley was given to the bishops of Rochester in the eighth...
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Handbook to the Environs of London: Alphabetically Arranged ..., Part 1

James Thorne - 1876 - 450 pages
...usually derived from the A.-S. brom-leag, a field or heath where broom grows : and, says Lysons, " the great quantity of that plant on all the waste places near the town sufficiently justifies this etymology."* Seventy years have passed since Lysons wrote, and now there are few waste...
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Handbook to the Environs of London: Alphabetically Arranged ..., Part 1

James Thorne - 1876 - 426 pages
...usually derived from the A.-S. brom-leag, a field or heath where broom grows : and, says Lysons, " the great quantity of that plant on all the waste places near the town sufficiently justifies this etymology."* Seventy years have passed since Lysons wrote, and now there are few waste...
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Handbook to the environs of London: alphabetically arranged, containing an ...

James Thorne - 1876 - 564 pages
...isually derived from the A.-S. brom-leag, i field or heath where broom grows : and, says Lysons, " the great quantity of that plant on all the waste places near the ;own sufficiently justifies this etymology."* Seventy years have passed since Lysons ivrote, and now...
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The Hastings Road and the "happy Springs of Tunbridge,"

Charles George Harper - 1906 - 312 pages
...remarks that " the AngloSaxon Brom-leay signifies a field, or heath, where broom grows," and that " the great quantity of that plant on all the waste places near the town fully justifies this etymology." Bromley Common was in great part enclosed soon after the middle of...
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