Chambers's Encyclopaedia: A Dictionary of Universal Knowledge, Volume 4

Front Cover
David Patrick, William Geddie
W. & R. Chambers, limited, 1924
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Page 141 - Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it may be compelled by impressed forces to change that state.
Page 22 - This great increase of the quantity of work which, in consequence of the division of labour, the same number of people are capable of performing, is owing to three different circumstances; first, to the increase of dexterity in every particular workman; secondly, to the saving of the time which is commonly lost in passing from one species of work to another ; and lastly, to the invention of a great number of machines which facilitate and abridge labour, and enable one man to do the work of many.
Page 327 - Alone in all history he estimated the greatness of man. One man was true to what is in you and me. He saw that God incarnates himself in man, and evermore goes forth anew to take possession of his World.
Page 327 - ... if the single man plant himself indomitably on his instincts, and there abide, the huge world will come round to him.
Page 292 - The elephant is reckoned the slowest breeder of all known animals, and I have taken some pains to estimate its probable minimum rate of natural increase; it will be...
Page 310 - This is owing to you, for you put it into my head by the question you put to me at Chalfont, which before I had not thought of.
Page 327 - There is no doctrine of the Reason which will bear to be taught by the Understanding. The understanding caught this high chant from the poet's lips, and said, in the next age, "This was Jehovah come down out of heaven. I will kill you, if you say he was a man.
Page 299 - If I live five years longer, the positive result of my existence on the side of truth and goodness will outweigh the small negative good that would have consisted in my not doing anything to shock others, and I can conceive no consequences that will make me repent the past.
Page 180 - There is nothing better for a man, than that he should eat and drink, and that he should make his soul enjoy good in his labour.
Page 171 - It may be doubted whether there are many other animals which have played so important a part in the history of the world, as have these lowly organized creatures.

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