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Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis. The collection of the entire exposition was truly a sight to behold, and worthy of a trip from America. on purpose to see it. Surely no one whose good fortune it was to be present will ever forget its vast treasures and the magnitude and extent of its contents.

Many Missourians availed themselves of so favorable a year and opportunity to visit Europe, and it was your commissioner's pleasure to extend to them a cordial welcome and show them all of interest in the great affair.

The awards of premiums had been made by the several juries prior to my arrival. The exposition opening the first of April, and the awards being made on the fifteenth of May.

I felt greatly annoyed at this, but no remedy was at hand. Honorable mention for a diploma was given to the American Wine Company of St. Louis for their display of imperial champagne and catawba. Also honorable mention to John C. Zallee of St. Louis, for a suit of clothes of very superior workmanship. Also honorable mention to G. R. Baker of St. Louis, for an ingenious bread kneader. Other prizes were richly deserved, but notwithstanding strong efforts were made to get the juries to reconsider and examine carefully our collection they would not depart from their rules.

Still the impression made by America as a whole was very gratifying. She carried off more prizes than any other country outside of France.

The devotedness and energy daily bestowed by your commissioner met with a very complimentary acknowledgment on the part of the United States commissioners, who elected him one of their number by a nearly unanimous vote. This was very gratifying and felt to be truly deserved, but no money accompanied it.

As your honorable body is aware no appropriation has been made by the Legislature for my two years' services, time and money bestowed upon this business of collecting and exhibiting the resources of Missouri, and I now respectfully appeal to your honorable body for a suitable appropriation to repay me. "The laborer is worthy of his hire." From the moment of my appointment to close of my labors I have ever faithfully devoted my best energies in your behalf, and that I pray that you will take early action for my relief from the heavy burden carried so long. Please find in the schedules annexed, full details of my labors, and your petitioner will ever pray, etc., etc. JAMES L. BUTLER.

Senator Gottschalk moved that the reading of the communication be dispensed with.

Motion lost.

Senator Evans moved to lay the communication on the table, Pending which motion Senator Morse moved a call of the Senate, which was sustained.

The roll of the Senate being called, there were

Present-Senators Birch, Blodgett, Boardman, Brown of Shelby, Brown of St. Louis, Bruere, Carroll, Cavender, Clark, Conrad, Davis, Dodson, Essex, Evans, Filler, Gottschalk, Graham, Human, Morrison, Morse, Rea, Ridgley, Rogers, Roseberry, Shelton, Todd, Waters and Williams-28.

Absent-Senator Rollins-1.

Absent with leave-Senators Elwell, Harbine, Headlee, Reed and Spaunhorst-5.

On motion of Senator Evans

Further proceedings under the call were dispensed with.

The question being on the motion to lay the communication on the table the same was adopted by the following vote, Senator Filler demanding the ayes and noes:

AYES Senators Birch, Brown of St. Louis, Bruere, Carroll, Conrad, Dodson, Essex, Evans, Filler, Gottschalk, Graham, Human, Morrison, Rogers, Roseberry, Shelton, Todd and Williams-18.

NOES Senators Blodgett, Boardman, Brown of Shelby, Cavender, Clark, Davis, Morse, Rea, Ridgley and Waters-10.

Absent-Senator Rollins-1.

Absent with leave-Senators Elwell, Harbine, Headlee, Reed and Spaunhorst-5.

On motion of Senator Evans

The Senate adjourned until ten o'clock to-morrow morning.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 1869.

MORNING SESSION.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

The President in the chair.

Prayer by the Chaplain, Rev. J. Wesley Johnson.

The journal of yesterday read and approved.

The roll of the Senate being called, there were

Present-Senators Birch, Boardman, Brown of Shelby, Brown of St. Louis, Bruere, Carroll, Cavender, Clark, Conrad, Davis, Dodson, Essex, Evans, Filler, Gottschalk, Graham, Harbine, Headlee, Human, Morrison, Morse, Ridgley, Rogers, Rollins, Roseberry, Shelton, Spaunhorst, Todd, Waters and Williams-30.

Absent-Senators Blodgett and Rea-2.

Absent with leave-Senators Elwell and Reed-2.

Senator Graham moved to reconsider the vote laying the communication of James L. Butler on the table.

Motion adopted by the following vote, Senator Ridgley demanding the ayes and noes:

AYES-Senators Birch, Boardman, Brown of Shelby, Brown of St. Louis, Carroll, Cavender, Clark, Davis, Essex, Gottschalk, Graham, Harbine, Headlee, Human, Morse, Ridgley, Rollins, Spaunhorst, Todd and Waters-20.

NOES-Senators Bruere, Conrad, Dodson, Evans, Filler, Morrison, Rogers, Roseberry, Shelton and Williams-10.

Absent-Senators Blodgett and Rea-2.

Absent with leave-Senators Elwell and Reed-2.

Senator Ridgley moved that the communication be referred to the Committee on Claims.

Senator Bruere moved to amend the motion by referring the communication to the Committee on Retrenchment.

Amendment agreed to and the communication so referred.

On leave, Senator Cavender introduced Senate concurrent resolution No. 7, as follows:

Concurrent resolution relative to the adjournment of the present General Assembly.

Resolved by the Senate, the House concurring therein, That this Legislature adjourn on the twenty-fifth day of February next.

Read the first time, rule suspended, read the second time, when the rules were further suspended, the resolution read the third time and passed by the following vote:

AYES-Senators Birch, Boardman, Brown of Shelby, Brown of St. Louis, Bruere, Carroll, Cavender, Conrad, Davis, Dodson, Essex, Filler, Gottschalk, Graham, Headlee, Human, Morrison, Morse, Rea, Ridgley, Roseberry, Shelton, Todd, Waters and Williams-25.

NOES-Senators Clark, Evans, Harbine, Rogers, Rollins and Spaun

horst-6.

Absent-Senator Blodgett-1.

Absent with leave-Senators Elwell and Reed-2.

The title of the resolution was then agreed to.

Senator Davis, chairman of the Committee on Enrolled Bills, submitted the following report:

SENATE CHAMBER, January 28, 1869.

MR. PRESIDENT-Your Committee on Enrolled Bills have examined the following bills and find them correctly enrolled:

Senate bill No. 10, entitled

An act to provide for the payment of special tax against the Missouri Institution for the Education of the Blind.

S. J.-11

Senate concurrent resolution No. 5, entitled

Concurrent resolution in relation to the redemption of Union Military Bonds.

Senate bill No. 55,

An act to change the time of holding circuit court in the fourth judicial circuit.

The President laid before the Senate the following communication and petition from citizens of St. Louis:

Sr. Louis, January 27, 1869. Hons. E. O. Stanard, Lieutenant Governor, and J. C. Orrick, Speaker, General Assembly of the State of Missouri:

GENTLEMEN-I have the honor herewith to hand you a memorial bearing the signatures of nearly twelve thousand of the citizens of St. Louis, asking your honorable body not to make any change in the present law regulating the police department of this city.

Inviting your attention to the memorial, I subscribe myself in behalf of the committee,

Very respectfully,

Your obedient servant,

CLINTON B. FISK.

Since the revelations of the investigating committee of the council we have heard of little else than clamors for amendments of the city charter. Men illy fitted for the discharge of the duties of law makers have suddenly sprung up and presented themselves as reformers, and have based their whole argument in support of the necessity for reform upon the fact that one or two of our city officials have been accused of malfeasance in office-as though any law could be passed that would make men honest, or any charter framed to prevent officers from peculating upon the treasury.

The voluminous report of this investigating committee embraces one hundred and sixty-four pages, but all the labor and expense of the investigation will not result in restoring one dollar to the city treasury that has been wrongfully taken therefrom.

Some of these ignorant self-styled reformers clamor for a change in the present police system of the city, and especially for making the police commissioners appointive by the Mayor and city council.

On the other hand many of our more intelligent citizens recognize in the present city charter as good a one as we have ever had, and in the different boards a great improvement upon the old method of doing the business of the city. The police board, in particular, has met with the hearty commendation of a large majority of our most prominent citizens and any change in regard to it is earnestly deprecated by them.

To show the feeling upon the subject, we will give a brief abstract of the proceedings at a social meeting, held one day last week, at a private residence. The names of the persons who participated in the meeting will be recognized at once as men of prominence and respectability.

In response to previous invitation a number of leading citizens met at the house of Colonel Ferd. Meyer, for the purpose of considering matters of importance connected with the police of this city. General C. B. Fisk was called to the chair. The meeting was addressed by Colonel Meyer, who stated that he had called them together for the purpose of considering matters connected with the police department, of taking

whatever action might be deemed necessary in view of the proposed change in that branch of the city government.

Major Eaton briefly stated his views in regard to the efficiency of the police force under the present system, and reviewed the character of the elements now arrayed in opposition to it.

Colonel Meyer called attention to the memorial of Mayor Thomas, and showed the falsity of charges therein contained. He briefly reviewed the work of the department during the past three or four years, and recounted the improvements which had been made during that time in the erection of new station houses and accommodations for prisoners, and the general condition of the police force.

C. P. Johnson expressed himself as strongly in favor of the present police system, which he considered the most efficient one St. Louis had ever had. He understood there was an effort being made to throw it back into the muddy pool of city politics. He hoped the meeting would take strong action against any such measures.

On motion of Mr. Johnson, a committee of five were appointed, consisting of Messrs. C. P. Johnson, Henry Hitchcock, Julius Hunicke, George Partridge and S. M. Edgell, with instructions to draft a memorial to the Legislature protesting against the proposition to place the appointment of the police commissioners in the hands of the Mayor and city council.

Major Eaton moved that the committee be further instructed to examine the financial affairs of the police department.

Mr. A. G. Braun seconded the motion. He was perfectly satisfied himself that everything in the department was all right, and he wanted others to feel the same.

Mr. B. R. Bonner expressed his admiration of the present efficient force of policemen. He felt proud of it, and thought it reflected much credit upon the honorable gentlemen who controlled it. He considered Colonel Meyer to be the proper man to be at its head. He was sorry to see such bitter opposition from Mayor Thomas, who seemed to be so unfortunately constituted as to be unable to agree with anybody. He hoped the Legislature would not abolish the present system, and was ready to give all his time and energy to its support.

Judge Wolff fully coincided in the sentiments expressed.

Mr. Colcord favored an investigation for reasons given by Mr. Braun. He felt satisfied with the present system and wished others to feel so.

General John McNiel was opposed to any further investigation. They had already had two, each of which had fully exculpated the board from all charges of fraud and corruption, and he considered that sufficient. He expressed himself warmly in favor of the present system, having become convinced from personal observation that it was the most efficient system that had been adopted.

Mr. C. R. Anderson was also opposed to any further investigation, and thought if anything should be done in that direction there should be an investigation into the numerous pardons by Mayor Thomas of inmates of the workhouse. He cited an instance of a desperado named Burk living in his neighborhood whom they could not as yet get rid of, by reason of the Mayor's leniency in this respect.

Mr. B. R. Bonner moved to lay the amendment on the table.

Mr. Hitchcock, from the committee, reported the following memorial:

To the Honorable the General Assembly of the State of Missouri: The undersigned, memorialists, citizens and tax payers of the city of St. Louis, would respectfully represent:

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