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No other nominations being made, the roll of the Senate was called, when the following Senators voted

FOR MR. THOMPSON-Senators Blodgett, Boardman, Brown of Shelby, Bruere, Cavender, Clark, Conrad, Davis, Elwell, Evans, Filler, Gottschalk, Graham, Harbine, Headlee, Human, Rea, Ridgley, Rogers, Roseberry, Shelton, Todd, Waters and Williams-24.

FOR MR. CLARK-Senators Birch, Brown of St. Louis, Carroll, Essex, Morrison, Morse and Reed-7.

Absent-Senator Dodson-1.

Mr. Thompson having received a majority of all the votes cast was declared duly elected Reporter of the Senate.

Senator Bruere offered the following resolution:

Resolved, That Capt. Julius Mueller is hereby appointed folder, Morris Urben messenger, and Charles Guenther and Adolphus Elsner, pages of this Senate.

Resolution read and adopted.

The officers elected came forward severally, took and subscribed the oath of office, and entered upon the duties of their office.

Senator Shelton offered the following resolution:

Resolved, That a committee of two be appointed by the President to inform the House of Representatives that the Senate was now organized and ready to proceed with business.

Resolution read and adopted.

The President appointed on said committee Senators Shelton and Ridgley.

Senator Bruere offered the following resolution:

Resolved, That the Sergeant-at-arms, Chaplain, Reporter, Folder, and every clerk of any committee employed under resolution of this Senate, shall receive as a compensation for their services each the sum of five dollars per day for every day they may serve as such; that the messenger and pages, and also the employees of the Doorkeeper, (the latter not to exceed, however, six in number), shall receive as a compensation for their services the sum of two dollars and fifty cents each per day for every day they may serve as such.

Resolution read and adopted.

Senator Todd offered the following resolution:

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Resolved, That each member and officer of the Senate be allowed three daily-papers during the session, to be paid for out of the Contingent Fund of the Senate. Each member to select the three papers may desire to take, and to furnish a list of the same to A. I. Curnett, who is hereby authorized to procure and distribute the same. Resolution read, when

Senator Ridgley offered the following substitute:

Resolved, That Jonathan Grimshaw is hereby authorized to furnish three newspapers, daily, to each member and officer of the Senate during the session of the Twenty-fifth General Assembly, to be paid for out of the Contingent Fund thereof.

Substitute read and rejected by the following vote, Senator Human demanding the ayes and noes:

AYES Senators Birch, Boardman, Brown of St. Louis, Carroll, Clark, Evans, Filler, Headlee, Human, Morrison, Morse, Rea, Ridgley and Reed-14.

NOES Senators Blodgett, Brown of Shelby, Bruere, Cavender, Conrad, Davis, Elwell, Essex, Gottschalk, Graham, Harbine, Rogers, Roseberry, Shelton, Todd, Waters and Williams-17.

Absent-Senator Dodson-1.

The resolution offered by Senator Todd was then adopted.

Senator Shelton offered the following resolution:

Resolved, That the Doorkeeper be instructed to furnish to each member of the Senate one hundred three cent postage stamps, to be paid for out of the Contingent Fund of the Senate.

Resolution read, when

Senator Ridgley offered the following amendment:
Insert "and also stamp all documents;"

Which amendment was accepted.

Senator Bruere offered the following amendment:
Insert "and officers;"

Which amendment was accepted.

Senator Evans offered the following substitute for the resolution: Resolved, That the Doorkeeper be instructed to procure postage stamps for the use of the Senate, to be paid for out of the Contingent Fund of the Senate.

Substitute read and rejected.

The resolution offered by Senator Shelton was then adopted.

On motion of Senator Human

The Senate adjourned until ten o'clock to-morrow morning.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 8th, 1869.

MORNING SESSION.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

The President, Lieutenant Governor Smith, in the chair.

Prayer by the Chaplain, Rev. Mr. Johnson.

The journal of yesterday read and approved.

The roll of the Senate being called, there were

Present-Senators Birch, Blodgett, Boardman, Brown of Shelby, Brown of St. Louis, Bruere, Carroll, Cavender, Clark, Conrad, Davis, Elwell, Essex, Evans, Filler, Gottschalk, Graham, Harbine, Headlee, Human, Morrison, Morse, Ridgley, Rogers, Roseberry, Reed, Shelton, Todd, Waters and Williams-30,

Absent-Senators Dodson and Rea-2.

On motion of Senator Harbine

It was ordered that a committee of three be appointed to superintend the printing of the rules of the Senate.

The President appointed Senators Harbine, Reed and Cavender.

On leave, Senator Reed offered Senate concurrent resolution, No. 1, as follows:

Concurrent resolution requiring the Secretary of State to produce election returns of vote for Governor and Lieutenant Governor, and for counting the same in the presence of both Houses of the General Assembly.

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Be it Resolved by the Senate, the House of Representatives concurring therein, That the two Houses of this General Assembly will meet in joint session in the House of Representatives on the day of 1869, at the hour of of said day to witness the counting of the vote for Governor and Lieutenant Governor, and that the Secretary of State be required to produce at that time, the original election returns from the county clerks of every county in this State, of the vote for Governor and Lieutenant Governor, so that the President of the Senate and Speaker of the House may examine said returns in the presence of both Houses, and declare who are elected to fill said offices. Resolution read the first time, and

On motion of Senator Bruere

Further action upon the same was postponed until Monday next.

Senator Conrad offered the following resolution:

Resolved, That the power to appoint watchmen and all other necessary employees about the capitol properly belong to the Commissioner of the Permanent Seat of Government under the statute, and is hereby declared to be vested in him.

Resolution read and

On motion of Senator Elwell

Action on the same was postponed until Monday next.

Senator Evans offered the following resolution :

Resolved, That the Secretary be instructed to procure from the Secretary of State, for the use of the members of the Senate, one copy of each of the Senate and House journals of the last General Assembly.

Resolution read and adopted.

The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Colby, Chief Clerk:

MR. PRESIDENT-I am instructed by the House of Representatives to inform the Senate that the following concurrent resolution has been introduced into and passed that body:

House concurrent resolution No. 6, entitled:

Concurrent Resolution informing the Governor of the organization of both Houses of the Twenty-fifth General Assembly of Missouri; In which the concurrence of the Senate is respectfully asked. Also, that the following gentlemen have been appointed by the Speaker as said committee on the part of the House, Messrs. Ledergerber, Donegan and Campbell.

I am also instructed by the House to inform the Senate that the House is organized by electing the following officers:

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On motion of Senator Bruere House Concurrent Resolution No. 1, as follows:

Be it Resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Mis souri, the Senate concurring therein,

That a committee of five, three on the part of the House and two on the part of the Senate, be appointed to inform his excellency, the Governor, of the organization of both Houses of the (25th) Twentyfifth General Assembly of Missouri, and whether he has any communication to make to them,

Was taken up, read and agreed to.

The President appointed Senators Bruere and Headlee as members of said committee on the part of the Senate.

On motion of Senator Cavender

The Senate took a recess for half an hour.

After a recess of some time the Senate was called to order by the President.

On motion of Senator Cavender

The Senate adjourned until two o'clock this afternoon.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

The President in the chair.

The roll being called the following Senators answered to their

names:

Senators Birch, Blodgett, Boardman, Brown of Shelby, Brown of St. Louis, Bruere, Carroll, Cavender, Conrad, Davis, Essex, Evans, Filler, Gottschalk, Graham, Harbine, Headlee, Human, Morrison, Ridgley, Rogers, Roseberry, Reed, Todd, Waters and Williams-26.

Absent-Senators Clark, Dodson, Elwell, Morse and Shelton-5.

Absent with leave-Senator Rea.

The following message was received from the Governor by Major Judd:

Senators and Representatives:

The general condition of the affairs of the State warrants me in congratulating you on entering upon the discharge of the duties devolved by the Constitution upon the legislative branch of the government.

We are in the full enjoyment of all the blessings of National Government, and feel the inspirations of the new and high hopes which are founded on the recent strong proof of the capacity and will of the people to govern themselves. The land is filled with plenty. Peace is confirmed. The voice of the people has called one who knows his duty wherever placed, and with majestic firmness performs the work set before him, and into his hands they give the nation's laws to be enforced. Confidence pervades the minds of the whole people that the soldier President will display, as the Chief Magistrate, the signal virtue and ability which have distinguished him as the head of the armies; that he will lead on in the civil department to the victories of peace which will vie in brilliancy with the successes of war. The men who upheld liberty and stood by the Union have selected him to stand guard for four years over the fruits of the victories in the field; and they repose in perfect security that in his hands the sword of the nation will protect their Constitution and laws, and that to their will as expressed in those laws, obedience will be compelled in every part of the Republic.

You come to the discharge of your high duties fully impressed, I trust, with the responsibility of making Free Missouri as distinguished for the justice and wisdom of her laws as for the possession of those natural advantages for which she is so famed.

The present prosperous condition of the State has been achieved in a contest with a hopeful, vigilant and untiring political party, led on by unscrupulous and desperate partisans, who have struggled with fearful energy to stay our course and weigh us down to the uninviting past. The decree of the people rendered in November last, has forever sealed the fate of the policies which opposed the advancing column of civilization and human progress. It is your proud privilege to

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