The Antiquary, Volume 22

Front Cover
Edward Walford, George Latimer Apperson
E. Stock, 1890
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Page 110 - When the custom of making square gardens enclosed with walls was thus established, to the exclusion of nature and prospect, pomp and solitude combined to call for something that might enrich and enliven the insipid and unanimated partition. Fountains first invented for use, which grandeur loves to disguise and throw out of the question, received embellishments from costly marbles, and at last, to contradict utility, tossed their waste of waters into air in spouting columns. Art, in the hands of rude...
Page 126 - Report on the Transcription and Publication of Parish Registers, etc. The Congress of Archaeological Societies in union with the Society of Antiquaries desires to call the attention of the public and especially of those interested in antiquarian research, to the extreme importance of duly preserving and rendering accessible the Registers and other Parish Eecords of the United Kingdom.
Page 126 - Transcription. LIMITS OF DATE. It is evident that there is most reason for transcribing the oldest Registers, but those of later date are also of great value, and it is suggested that 1812, the date of the Act of 52 Geo. Ill, cap. 146, is a suitable point to which copies may be taken.
Page 126 - As the older writings are in a different character from that used at the present time, they are not easily deciphered, and require careful examination even from experts. It is extremely desirable, therefore, that they should be transcribed, not only to guard against possible loss or injury, but in order to render them more easily and generally accessible to the student. Many register...
Page 108 - The red'ning apple ripens here to gold. Here the blue fig with luscious juice o'erflows, With deeper red the full pomegranate glows, The branch here bends beneath the weighty pear, And verdant olives flourish round the year.
Page 126 - COPIES. The decipherment of old Registers is, as already pointed out, a •work of considerable difficulty, and it is therefore strongly recommended that in cases where the transcribers have no great previous experience, they should obtain the help of some competent reader to collate the transcript with the original. It should be remembered that in many cases transcripts are preserved in the Bishops' Registries and a reference to these will often fill up a void, clear up^a difficulty or supply an...
Page 111 - The passing through the gloom from the grotto to the opening day, the retiring and again assembling shades, the dusky groves, the larger lawn, and the solemnity of the termination at the cypresses that lead up to his mother's tomb, are managed with exquisite judgment ; and though Lord Peterborough assisted him To form his quincunx and to rank his vines...
Page 104 - ... night. In the days of the Roman Empire, when Uriconium was standing, a very wicked city stood where we now see Bomere Pool. The inhabitants had turned back from Christianity to heathenism, and though God sent one of the Roman soldiers to be a prophet to them, like Jonah to Nineveh, they would not repent. Far from that, they ill-used and persecuted the preacher. Only the daughter of the governor remained constant to the faith. She listened gladly to the Christian's teaching, and he on his part...
Page 127 - A Standing Committee has been appointed by the Congress for the purpose of giving advice and distributing to the various Societies in Union such information and lists as may be of common value to all. Societies...
Page 111 - The measured walk, the quincunx, and the etoile imposed their unsatisfying sameness on every royal and noble garden. Trees were headed, and their sides pared away; many French groves seem green chests set upon poles. Seats of marble, arbours and...

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