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FROM

THE ANGLERS,

EIGHT DIALOGUES IN VERSE,

ASCRIBED TO DR. SCOTT, OF IPSWICH, 1738.

WALTON could teach; his meek enchanting vein
The Shepherd's mingles with the Fisher's strain :
Nature and Genius animate his lines,

And our whole Science in his precepts shines.

WRITTEN BY

JAMES PARK, ESQ.,

LATE PROFESSOR OF LAW, KINGS COLLEGE, LONDON.

Ar nobis rigui fontes et flumina cordi;
Nos potius tua, Sancta Senex, veneranda per ævum
Auguria, et grato exequimur præcepta labore;
Omnia quæ quondam Leæ labentis ad undam
Cantasti: neque enim mihi fas, WALTONE, tacere
Mentem in te facilem, et nullis pallentia culpis
Pectora, et antiquâ sanctam pietate senectam.

Felix, cui placidæ fraudes atque otia curæ,
Piscator! tibi enim tranquillo in corde severum
Subsidet desiderium, tibi sedulus angor;
Dum tremula undarum facies, et mobilis umbra,
Dum puræ grave murmur aquæ, virtute quietâ
Composuêre animum, et blandis affectibus implent.

TRANSLATION BY ARCHDEACON WRANGHAM.

MINE be the brook's green side, the river stream,
Whilst still, obedient to the instructive theme,
Sport of thy simple muse by gliding Lea,

I strive with grateful toil, to follow thee.
For, WALTON, crime it were to leave unsung
Thy gentle mind, thy breast unblanch'd by wrong,
And, vivid glowing on the graphic page,

Thy guileless manners, and thy hallowed age.
Happy Piscator! with the viewless line,
Tranquil to dupe the finny tribe was thine.
Fled from thy tranquil bosom gnawing care,
No tumult throbb'd, no malice darken'd there;
The stream light quivering to the summer breeze,
The quickly shifting shade of clouds or trees,
The ripples' murmur breathed a holy rest,
And to complacent calmness lull'd thy breast.

THE FOLLOWING

GRACEFUL VERSES

Were written in a copy of the Complete Angler, which belonged to Sir Humphrey Davy, "by a noble lady, long distinguished at court for preeminent beauty and grace, and whose mind possesses undying charms," who is supposed to be the present Lady Charlotte Bury, then Lady Charlotte Campbell :

ALBEIT, gentle Angler, I

Delight not in thy trade,
Yet in thy pages there doth lie
So much of quaint simplicity-
So much of mind

Of such good kind,

That none need be afraid

Caught by thy cunning bait, this book-
To be ensnared on thy hook.

Gladly from thee, I'm lured to bear

With things that seem'd most vile before;

For thou didst on poor subjects rear
Matter the wisest sage might hear;
And, with a grace,

That doth efface

More labor'd works, thy simple lore
Can teach us that thy skilful lines
More than the scaly brood confines.

Our hearts and senses, too, we see
Rise quickly at thy master hand,
And ready to be caught by thee,
Are lured to virtue willingly;
Content and peace,

With health and ease,

Walk by thy side; at thy command
We bid adieu to worldly care,

And joy in gifts that all may share.

Gladly with thee I pace along,
And of sweet fancy dream-
Waiting till some inspired song,
Within my memory cherished long,
Comes fairer forth,

With more of worth,

Because that time, upon its stream,
Feathers and chaff will bear away,
But gives to gems a brighter ray.

C. C. 1812.

SONNET.

WALTON! when, weary of the world, I turn
My pensive soul to thee, I soothing find
The meekness of thy plain contented mind
Act like some healing charm. From thee I learn
To sympathize with nature, nor repine

At Fortune who, tho' lavish of her store,
Too often leaves her favorites richly poor,

Wanting both health and

Life's blessings to enjoy.

energy divine,

Methinks ev'n now

I hear thee 'neath the milk-white scented thorn

Communing with thy pupil, as the morn

Her rosy cheek displays,-while streams that flow,
And all that gambol near their rippling source,

Enchanted listen to thy sweet discourse.

EDWARD MOXON.

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