Page images
PDF
EPUB

Ralph Pagenel.

half for geld. Land to three ploughs. Ralph has [it], and it is waste. T. R. E., it was worth twenty shillings.

Manor. In Distone (Kirk Deighton), Merlesuan had twelve carucates of land for geld. The land is to six ploughs. Ralph has [it] now. A church is there. Wood, pasturable, half a leuga in length and half [a leuga] in breadth. T. R. E., it was worth sixty shillings; now, four shillings.

Soke. In Tuadestorp (Thorpe Green) is soke of Neuuetone (Newton-upon-Ouse) of one carucate and a half of land for geld. The land is to one plough. Wood, pasturable, half a leuga in length_and four quarenteens in breadth. Ralph has [it], and it is waste. Four acres of meadow there.

XVIII. LAND 87 OF GOISFRID DE LA WIRCE.8
88

Westreding (WEST RIDING).

In Adelingesfluet" (Adlingfleet), Siuuardbar had six carucates of land for geld. The land is to three ploughs. Now, Goisfrid de Wirce has one plough there, and thirteen villanes and one bordar with three ploughs. A church [is] there, and a priest, and one mill of ten shillings [annual value]. Underwood, one leuga in length and one quarenteen in breadth. The whole manor, two leugæ in length and one in breadth. T. R. E., it was worth four pounds; now, thirty shillings.

[blocks in formation]

Manor. In Brantone (Brampton, par. Cantley) and Canteleia (Cantley), Tochi had fourteen carucates and one bovate and a half of

87 See note 86.

88 Geoffrey de la Wirce derived his name from his seigneury of La Guerche, a town near Rennes, on the borders of Brittany. He was the son and heir of Silvester, lord of La Guerche and Pouencé, chancellor of Brittany, and Bishop of Rennes from 1075 to 1096. His wife's name was Alueve, but by her he had no issue. He died about 1093-4, and was succeeded by his brother (?) Walter, surnamed Hay.

Geoffrey obtained Melton-Moubray, and 26 other manors in Leicestershire, 12 in Warwickshire, and the Isle of Axholme, with the manors of Gainsbrough, Somerby and Blyborough in Lincolnshire (Yorks. Arch. and Top. Journal, iv., 223-226).

89"The boat-floating creek of the Atheling, or, perhaps, of the son of Adla" (Ibid., p. 224n.). 90 Sec note $6.

91 The parentage and birthplace of Geoffrey Alselin have not, I believe, been ascertained. We learn from the Survey that he got the lands of the thane Tochi, son of Otta (see vol. xiii., page 327), in the counties of Derby, Leicester, Lincoln, Northampton and Nottingham. The date of his death is not known. He left a daughter and heiress, married to Robert de Caux, by whom she had a son and heir, Robert.

The above-named Geoffrey Alselin bad a nephew, Ralph Alselin, whose son Geoffrey, living in 1108, had a son, Ralph, who was alive in 1131 and 1168. Rosa Alselin, granddaughter and heiress of the last-mentioned Ralph, married Thomas, Lord Bardolf, by whom she had a son and heir, Doun, or Dodo, Bardolf (of full age in 1198), whose widow, Beatrix, daughter and heiress of William de Warenne, married, secondly, Hubert de Burgh, Earl of Kent.

Goisfrid Alselin.

land for geld. Land to fifteen ploughs. Now, Goisfrid Alselin has two ploughs there, and six villanes and two sokemen and five bordars having six ploughs and a half. A priest [is] there, and a church.

92

Manor. In the same vill, Alsi had one carucate 2 of land for geld. Land to half a plough. Wood, pasturable, one leuga in length and one in breadth. The whole manor, two leugæ in length and two in breadth. T. R. E., it was worth eight pounds; now, thirty shillings.

Manor. In Hailaga (Healaugh) and two Wicheles (Wighill and Wighill Park), Tochi had eighteen carucates of land for geld. The land is to nine ploughs. Now, Goisfrid has two ploughs there, and eighteen villanes and one bordar with seven ploughs. Wood, pasturable, two leugæ in length and two in breadth. The whole manor, two leugæ in length and two in breadth. T. R. E., it was worth eight pounds; now, sixty shillings.

XX. LAND 93 OF WALTER DE AINCURT.94

Westreding (WEST RIDING).

T. R. E.,

) is soke

Manor. In Wanbella (Wombwell), Tori had three carucates and a half of land for geld. The land is to four ploughs. Walter de Aincurt has [it], and it is waste. Four acres of meadow there. Wood, pasturable, five quarenteens and a half in length and as much in breadth. it was worth sixty shillings; now, ten shillings and eight pence. Soke. In Medeltone (West Melton) and Toftes ( of this manor, six bovates for geld. Land to half a plough. Manor. In Rodemesc (Rawmarsh), Stori 96 had four carucates of land for geld. Land to two ploughs. Now, Walter has one plough there, and four villanes and one bordar and two sokemen having two ploughs. Twelve acres of meadow there, and one mill of ten shillings [annual value]. Wood, pasturable, one leuga in length and half [a leuga] in breadth. The whole manor, one leuga and a half in length and one leuga in breadth. shillings.

T. R. E., it was worth sixty shillings; now, thirty

92 This carucate is not accounted for in the Recapitulation.

93 Orig., fo. 326a, col. 2.-Facsimile Edit., page lviib.

94 A native, probably, of Aincourt, near Mantes, in the Norman Vexin. He obtained also several manors in Derbyshire, Lincolnshire and Nottinghamshire. Blankney, near Sleaford, appears to have been his principal residence, as it was the head of the barony of his descendants.

Walter de Aincourt was succeeded by his son, Ralph, who, by Basilea, his wife,

had a son and heir, Walter de Aincourt, "a liberal benefactor to St. Mary's abbey, York, as was, also, Matilda, his wife' (Yorks. Arch. and Top. Journal, iv., 228).

95 Doubtless Tor, a king's thane, who had a manor in Wombwell and West Melton before the date of the Survey, and at the time it was taken. Pos-ibly he was the king's tenant of that name in Branton Green, Harewood, and East Kes wick (see Land of the King, antea).

96 Refer to the previous note.

XXI. LAND 97 OF GISLEBERT DE GAND.98

Estreding (EAST RIDING).

Manor. In Hundemanebi (Hunmanby), Carle had twenty-three carucates of land for geld. The land is to thirteen ploughs. Now, Gislebert de Gand has three ploughs there, and eight villanes and six bordars having four ploughs. A priest is there, and a church; and meadow one leuga in length and half [a leuga] in breadth.

93

Manor. In the same vill, Chilbert had one carucate of land for geld. Land to half a plough. Gislebert has [it], and it is waste. T. R. E., it was worth four shillings.

Berewick. In Ricstorp (

) is a berewick of this manor, Land to three ploughs. Gislebert

of four carucates of land for geld.
has there five villanes and two bordars with two ploughs.
To this manor belongs this soke

97 See note 93.

98 A younger son, it is probable, of Ralph de Gand, Lord of Alost, a town near the city of Ghent, in Flanders. The name of his mother appears to have been Gisle, and she had a son, Ralph de Gand, chamberlain of Flanders, another of the younger sons of Ralph, whose eldest son and heir was Baldwin, Lord of Alost, who married Mand, a sister of the Conqueror, and died in 1081.

Mr. Ellis considers it not unlikely that Gilbert was descended from Alfred the Great, through his daughter Elftrude, wife of Baldwin, Count of Flanders, and her granddaughter Leutgarde, who was married to Wichman, Count of the castle of Gand, from whom Gilbert (the tenant in capite) was sixth in descent male (Yorks. Arch. and Top. Journal, iv., 230).

When York surrendered to the Conqueror in 1068, Gilbert de Gand was left in command of the city, conjointly with William Malet and Robert fitz Richard. On Sept. 21st, 1069, when it was retaken by the Danes, he was one of the few who were spared as prisoners of war for exchange or ransom (Ibid., p. 231).

Gilbert de Gand obtained valuable estates in Lincolnshire, Notts, Rutland and elsewhere, which had belonged to Ulf the Constable, whose mansion in the city of Lincoln was also given to him. According to the testimony of the men of Barkston wapentake, Gislebert de Gand held one carucate of the land of Ulf in Berchine (see The Claims, postea). This Ulf may have been the same person as the above-mentioned Ulf the Constable.

Gilbert died about 1094, and was

:-Mustone (Muston), four caru

buried in the abbey church at Bardney, in Lincolnshire, which he had refounded and endowed. His wife was Alice, daughter of Hugh de Montfort, lord of Montfort sur Risle, and eventually heiress of her brother. By her he had issue: 1. Gilbert, who died s.p. in his father's lifetime; 2. Hugh, who inherited the fief of his mother's family, and assumed the name of Montfort; 3. Walter de Gand, heir to all his father's estates in England, and the founder of Bridlington priory, married Matilda, daughter of Earl Stephen, of Richmond, and was ancestor of the Earls of Lincoln. Robert de Gand, Dean of York from 1148 to 1153, may have been another son. Of the daughters of this tenant in capite, Emma became the wife of Alan de Perci, who had with her Hunmanby in frank marriage.

Gilbert de Alost, one of the vassals of the above-mentioned Walter de Gand, married Erneburgha, heiress of Burton, in Holderness, widow of Ulbert the Constable, and mother of Robert le Constable, from whom the Constables of Burton Constable derive their descent.

99 A name of frequent occurrence in the East Riding. Under the heading "Land of the King," we find it at Burton Fleming, Caythorpe, Wold-Newton, and Thwing. At Cowlam, Chilbert and his brother held two manors; and in Nunkeeling "duo Chilvert" had held two manors which were given to Drogo de Beuvre. Chilbert, a king's thane, who still possessed one carucate in Wharram-Percy, may have been the same person as Clibert the thane, who continued to hold the manors of Flambrough, Hilderthorpe, Marton and Sewerby.

Gislebert de Gand.

cates, Scolfstona 100 (

), three carucates, Flotemanebi (Flotmanby), six carucates. Together, for geld, fourteen (sic) carucates of land. Land to seven ploughs. Gislebert has there sixteen villanes and four bordars having four ploughs.

Berewick. In Neuton (Wold Newton), a berewick of this manor, seven carucates of land for geld. The land is to four ploughs. The whole of Hundemanebi (Hunmanby), three leugæ in length and two in breadth. T. R. E., it was worth twelve pounds; now, sixty shillings.

[blocks in formation]

Three manors. In Aluengi3 (Kirk Ella), Aluuin, Chetel [and] Cnud had twenty-three carucates of land for geld. The land is to twelve ploughs. Now, Gislebert Tison has three ploughs there, and twenty-nine villanes and sixteen bordars having six ploughs. A church'

100 Scloftone," in the Recapitulation.

1 Orig., fo. 326b, col. 1.-Facsimile Edit., page lviii.

2 The birthplace and parentage of this tenant in capite, is, I believe, unknown. By an undated charter (1066-9), witnessed by Aldred, archbishop of York, "dom. Gilbertus Tison, dom. regis Angliæ summus vexillator,-ad instantiam nobilis reginæ Angliæ, Matildis nomine, pro animabus regis S. Edwardi et Willelmi Bastardi, concessit ecclesiæ de Seleby, et monachis ibidem," lands in Bubwith, Foggathorpe and Lund. In a subsequent deed, witnessed by Archbishop Thomas (1070-1100), his son, Adam Tison, and others, he omits his official rank, but adds the consent of his wife and sons. By it he gave to the same monks "Gundeby" (Gunby, co. York), "et decimam in Aigruna (Eakring, Notts) et in Alvelay (Kirk Ella, co. York), ut in eadem ecclesia esset plenarius frater." He also gave lands in Runthorpe (?) and Helmeley (? Helueley -Kirk Ella) to St. Mary's Abbey, York, circa 1088-9.

In the register of Alnwick priory, Gilbert Tison is called Lord of Malton and Alnwick, the castle at the last-named place being probably the "caput" of his barony. About 1095 his estates were escheated, and divided between Nigel de Albini and Ivo de Vesci. The date of his death has not been ascertained, but, in 1131, his son Adam rendered an account of his debts. The latter suc

ceeded his father, and, with the consent of Emma, his wife, and William, his son, gave Aton-croft, in Holme-on-Spalding Moor, to the monks of Selby. He was also a benefactor to the Knights Hospitallers, and to the priories of Rufford and Thurgarton.

Richard Tison, the other son of Gilbert, founded the chapel of St. Wilfrid at Guyzance, and witnessed the charter of Eustace fitz John, founding Alnwick priory. He left a son William, whose son German Tison (living in 1213) had a daughter and heiress, Bona, who (about 1198) became the wife of William de Hilton. Their son and heir, Sir Alexander de Hilton (under age in 1208) was a Crusader in 1241, and died before 1243, leaving issue (see "The Lords of Alnwick," by Geo. Tate and W. H. D. Longstaffe).

3 Aluengi" is, doubtless, an error for "Aluenbi," the home of Aluuin, who, as stated in the text, once held a manor here. Ella, the brave king of Deira, who invaded his new kingdom by entering the Humber, may have selected this spot (which commands an extensive view of the river) for a residence, near to which a church would soon be erected. His name would be remembered long after that of Alwin was forgotten, and the place be thenceforward known as Kirk Ella.

4 The church was given to the monks of Selby by Gilbert Tison.

Gislebert Tison.

[is] there, and a priest. T. R. E., it was worth eight pounds; now, six pounds.

Manor. In Hase (Hessle), Aluuin and Chetel had seven carucates of land for geld. The land is to four ploughs. Now, Gislebert has one plough there, and seventeen villanes and two bordars with three ploughs. A church [is] there, and a priest. One leuga in length and half [a lenga] in breadth. T. R. E., it was worth sixty shillings; now, fifty shillings.

5

6

Manor. In Umlouebi (Anlaby), Cnut had three carucates and a half of land for geld. The land is to two ploughs. Now, Gislebert has one plough there, and seven villanes with one plough. T. R. E., it was worth forty shillings; now, fifty shillings. Richard holds [it]. Manor. In Chrachetorp ( ), Cnut had three carucates for geld. The land is to two ploughs. Fulcho, Gislebert's homager, has [it], and it is waste. T. R. E., it was worth thirty shillings. Manor and berewick. In Weresa (Wressel) and Siuuarbi ), Aluuin had eight carucates of land for geld. The land is to four ploughs. Now, Gislebert has one plough there, and sixteen villanes and five bordars with five ploughs. A priest [is] there, and a church. Wood, pasturable, one leuga in length and one quarenteen and a half in breadth. The whole manor, two leugæ in length and one in breadth. T. R. E., it was worth forty shillings; now, sixty shillings. To this manor belongs [this] soke :-in Spellinton (Spaldington), six carucates of land, and in Lont (Lund), one carucate and a half of land. The land is to four ploughs. Now, two sokemen are there with half a plough.

8

To the same manor belongs other [soke]:-in Wilgetot (Willitoft), seven bovates, and Gripetorp (Gribthorpe), two carucates, and Ladon (Laytham), eleven bovates. Together, for geld, four carucates and two bovates of land for geld (sic). The land is to three ploughs. Gislebert has four villanes and one bordar there with one plough and a half. In Nortdufelt (North Duffield) one carucate of land which belongs to Weresa (Wressel).

Manor. In Bonnebi (Gunby), Aluuin had one carucate and three bovates of land for geld. The land is to one plough. Now, Gislebert has one plough there, and one sokeman and two villanes with one plough. One leuga in length and four quarenteens in breadth. T. R. E., it was worth twenty shillings; now, sixty shillings.

5 The church of All Saints was given to the priory of Gisburn. "It was originally the mother church to Trinity, Hull" (Archbishop Sharp's MSS.).

In the Recapitulation, under "Hase Hundret," 14 carucates are assigned to G. Tison in "Weresa," and "Siuuarbi" is omitted there. In "Siuuardbi," in "Huntou Hundret " (Sewerby, near Bridlington), the Count of Mortain held 6 carucates, which quantity added to the 8 carucates mentioned in the text, nearly agrees with the Recapitulation. This is a curious coincidence (unless it be an error), and it is also singular that

[blocks in formation]
« PreviousContinue »